Posts Tagged ‘sr5690’

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AMD Chipsets Launched: Fiorano and Kroner Platforms to Follow

September 21, 2009

The Channel Register is reporting on the launch of AMD’s motherboard chipsets which will drive new socket-F based Fiorano and Kroner platforms as well as the socket G34 and C32 based Maranello and San Marino platforms. The Register also points out that no tier one PC maker is announcing socket-F solutions based on the new chipsets today. However, motherboard and “barebones” maker Supermicro is also announcing new A+ server, blade and workstation variants using the new AMD SR5690 and SP5100 chipsets, enabling:

  • GPU-optimized designs: Support up to four double-width GPUs along with two CPUs and up to 3 additional high-performance add-on cards.
  • Up to 10 quad-processor (MP) or dual-processor (DP) Blades in a 7U enclosure: Industry-leading density and power efficiency with up to 240 processor cores and 640GB memory per 7U enclosure.
  • 6Gb/s SAS 2.0 designs: Four-socket and two-socket server and workstation solutions with double the data throughput of previous generation storage architectures.
  • Universal I/O designs: Provide flexible I/O customization and investment protection.
  • QDR InfiniBand support option: Integrated QDR IB switch and UIO add-on card solution for maximum I/O performance.
  • High memory capacity: 16 DIMM models with high capacity memory support to dramatically improve memory and virtualization performance.
  • PCI-E 2.0 Slots plus Dual HT Links (HT3) to CPUs: Enhance motherboard I/O bandwidth and performance. Optimal for QDR IB card support.
  • Onboard IPMI 2.0 support: Reduces remote management costs.

Eco-Systems based on Supermicro’s venerable AS2021M – based on the NVidia nForce Pro 3600 chipset – can now be augmented with the Supermicro AS2021A variant based on AMD’s SR5690/SP5100 pairing. Besides offering HT3.0 and on-board Winbond WPCM450 KVM/IP BMC module, the new iteration includes support for the SR5690’s IOMMU function (experimentally supported by VMware), 16 DDR2 800/667/533 DIMMs, and four PCI-E 2.0 slots – all in the same, familiar 2U chassis with eight 3.5″ hot-swap bays.

AMD’s John Fruehe outlines AMD’s market approach for the new chipsets in his “AMD at Work” blog today. Based on the same basic logic/silicon, the SR5690, SR5670 and SR5650 all deliver PCI-E 2.0 and HT3.0 but at differing levels of power consumption and PCI Express lanes to their respective platforms. Paired with appropriate “power and speed” Opteron variant, these platforms offer system designers, virtualization architects and HPC vendors greater control over price-performance and power-performance constraints that drive their respective environments.

AMD chose the occasion of the Embedded Systems Conference in Boston to announce its new chipset to the world. Citing performance-per-watt advantages that could enhance embedded systems in the telecom, storage and security markets, AMD’s press release highlighted three separate vendors with products ready to ship based on the new AMD chipsets.

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Quick Take: HP’s Sets Another 48-core VMmark Milestone

August 26, 2009

Not satisfied with a landmark VMmark score that crossed the 30 tile mark for the first time, HP’s performance team went back to the benches two weeks later and took another swing at the performance crown. Well, the effort paid off, and HP significantly out-paced their two-week-old record with a score of 53.73@35 tiles in the heavy weight, 48-core category.

Using the same 8-processor HP ProLiant DL785 G6 platform as in the previous run – complete with 2.8GHz AMD Opteron 8439 SE 6-core chips and 256GB DDR2/667 – the new score comes with significant performance bumps in the javaserver, mailserver and database results achieved by the same system configuration as the previous attempt – including the same ESX 4.0 version (164009). So what changed to add an additional 5 tiles to the team’s run? It would appear that someone was unsatisfied with the storage configuration on the mailserver run.

Given that the tile ratio of the previous run ran about 6% higher than its 24-core counterpart, there may have been a small indication that untapped capacity was available. According to the run notes, the only reported changes to the test configuration – aside from the addition of the 5 LUNs and 5 clients needed to support the 5 additional tiles – was a notation indicating that the “data drive and backup drive for all mailserver VMs” we repartitioned using AutoPart v1.6.

The change in performance numbers effectively reduces the virtualization cost of the system by 15% to about $257/VM – closing-in on its 24-core sibling to within $10/VM and stretching-out its lead over “Dunnington” rivals to about $85/VM. While virtualization is not the primary application for 8P systems, this demonstrates that 48-core virtualization is definitely viable.

SOLORI’s Take: HP’s performance team has done a great job tuning its flagship AMD platform, demonstrating that platform performance is not just related to hertz or core-count but requires balanced tuning and performance all around. This improvement in system tuning demonstrates an 18% increase in incremental scalability – approaching within 3% of the 12-core to 24-core scaling factor, making it actually a viable consideration in the virtualization use case.

In recent discussions with AMD about the SR5690 chipset applications for Socket-F, AMD re-iterated that the mainstream focus for SR5690 has been Magny-Cours and the Q1/2010 launch. Given the close relationship between Istanbul and Magny-Cours – detailed nicely by Charlie Demerjian at Semi-Accurate – the bar is clearly fixed for 2P and 4P virtualization systems designed around these chips. Extrapolating from the similarities and improvements to I/O and memory bandwidth, we expect to  see 2P VMmarks besting 32@23 and 4P scores over 54@39 from HP, AMD and Magny-Cours.

SOLORI’s 2nd Take: Intel has been plugging away with its Nehalem-EX for 8-way systems and – delivering 128-threads – promises to deliver some insane VMmarks. Assuming Intel’s EX scales as efficiently as AMD’s new Opterons have, extrapolations indicate performance for the 4P, 64-thread Nehalem-EX shoud fall between 41@29 and 44@31 given the current crop of speed and performance bins. Using the same methods, our calculus predicts an 8P, 128-thread EX system should deliver scores between 64@45 and 74@52.

With EX expected to clock at 2.66GHz with 140W TDP and AMD’s MCM-based Magny-Cours doing well to hit 130W ACP in the same speed bins, CIO’s balancing power and performance considerations will need to break-out the spreadsheets to determine the winners here. With both systems running 4-channel DDR3, there will be no power or price advantage given on either side to memory differences: relative price-performance and power consumption of the CPU’s will be major factors. Assuming our extrapolations are correct, we’re looking at a slight edge to AMD in performance-per-watt in the 2P segment, and a significant advantage in the 4P segment.

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Quick Take: HP Plants the Flag with 48-core VMmark Milestones

August 12, 2009

Following on the heels of last month we predicted that HP could easily claim the VMmark summit with its DL785 G6 using AMD’s Istanbul processors:

If AMD’s Istanbul scales to 8-socket at least as efficiently as Dunnington, we should be seeing some 48-core results in the 43.8@30 tile range in the next month or so from HP’s 785 G6 with 8-AMD 8439 SE processors. You might ask: what virtualization applications scale to 48-cores when $/VM is doubled at the same time? We don’t have that answer, and judging by Intel and AMD’s scale-by-hub designs coming in 2010, that market will need to be created at the OEM level.

Well, HP didn’t make us wait too long. Today, the PC maker cleared two significant VMmark milestones: crossing the 30 tile barrier in a single system (180 VMs) and exceeding the 40 mark on VMmark score. With a score of 47.77@30 tiles, the HP DL785 G6 – powered by 8 AMD Istanbul 8439 SE processors and 256GB of DDR2/667 memory – set the bar well beyond the competition and does so with better performance than we expected – most likely due to AMD’s “HT assist” technology increasing its scalability.

Not available until September 14, 2009, the HP DL785 G6 is a pricey competitor. We estimate – based on today’s processor and memory prices – that a system as well appointed as the VMmark-configured version (additional NICs, HBA, etc) will run at least $54,000 or around $300/VM (about $60/VM higher than the 24-core contender and about $35/VM lower than HP’s Dunnnigton “equivalent”).

SOLORI’s Take: While the September timing of the release might imply a G6 with AMD’s SR5690 and IOMMU, we’re doubtful that the timing is anything but a coincidence: even though such a pairing would enable PCIe 2.0 and highly effective 10Gbps solutions. The modular design of the DL785 series – with its ability to scale from 4P to 8P in the same system – mitigates the economic realities of the dwindling 8P segment, and HP has delivered the pinnacle of performance for this technology.

We are also impressed with HP’s performance team and their ability to scale Shanghai to Istanbul with relative efficiency. Moving from DL785 G5 quad-core to DL785 G6 six-core was an almost perfect linear increase in capacity (95% of theoretical increase from 32-core to 48-core) while performance-per-tile increased by 6%. This further demonstrates the “home run” AMD has hit with Istanbul and underscores the excellent value proposition of Socket-F systems over the last several years.

Unfortunately, while they demonstrate a 91% scaling efficiency from 12-core to 24-core, HP and Istanbul have only achieved a 75% incremental scaling efficiency from 24-cores to 48-cores. When looking at tile-per-core scaling using the 8-core, 2P system as a baseline (1:1 tile-to-core ratio), 2P, 4P and 8P Istanbul deliver 91%, 83% and 62.5% efficiencies overall, respectively. However, compared to the %58 and 50% tile-to-core efficiencies of Dunnington 4P and 8P, respectively, Istanbul clearly dominates the 4P and 8P performance and price-performance landscape in 2009.

In today’s age of virtualization-driven scale-out, SOLORI’s calculus indicates that multi-socket solutions that deliver a tile-to-core ratio of less than 75% will not succeed (economically) in the virtualization use case in 2010, regardless of socket count. That said – even at a 2:3 tile-to-core ratio – the 8P, 48-core Istanbul will likely reign supreme as the VMmark heavy-weight champion of 2009.

SOLORI’s 2nd Take: HP and AMD’s achievements with this Istanbul system should be recognized before we usher-in the next wave of technology like Magny-Cours and Socket G34. While the DL785 G6 is not a game changer, its footnote in computing history may well be as a preview of what we can expect to see out of Magny-Cours in 2H/2010. If 12-core, 4P system price shrinks with the socket count we could be looking at a $150/VM price-point for a 4P system: now that would be a serious game changer.

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Quick Take: DDR3 Prices on the Rise

August 4, 2009

DDR-128x128In the current server-class arms race, Intel and AMD have secured separate quarters: Intel’s rival QPI architecture coupled to a 3-channel DDR3 memory bus and functional hyper-threading cores (top bin parts) holds the pure performance sector; while AMD’s improved Istanbul cores can be delivered 6 at a time and paired with inexpensive DDR2 memory to achieve better price-performance (acquisition). Both solutions deliver about the same economies in power consumption under virtualized loads.

All in all, the Twin2 with Xeon L5520 CPUs is the best platform for those seeking an affordable server with an excellent performance/watt ratio at an affordable price. On the other hand, if performance/price is the most important criterion followed by performance/watt, we would probably opt for the six-core Opteron version of the Twin2. Supermicro has “a blade killer” avialable with the Twin², especially for those people who like to keep the hardware costs low.

John De Gelas, AnantTech, July 22, 2009

Global DDR2 and DDR3 Capacity

Global DDR2 and DDR3 Capacity

Meanwhile, the cost differential between DDR3 and DDR2 continues to widen due to increased demand in the notebook sector and reduced supply (capacity). According to DRAMeXchange, the trend will continue into Q4/09 as suppliers are expected to commit up to 30% of capacity to DDR3 by that time.

At the same time, DDR3 prices continue to inch up, by 5% in July, while DDR2 prices have appeared to bottom-out. This trend in DDR3 pricing is consistent across all speed ratings (1066/1333/1600) and, despite artificial downward price pressure from Samsung, has managed to drift upward 20% since May, 2009.

DRAMeXchange, DDR3 1Gb 128Mx8 1333MHz Price Chart

DDR3 Price Trend, May to August, 2009

Because low-end, lower-priced 2GB DDR3/1066 ($60/stick) memory shows little advantage over 2GB DDR2/800 ($35/stick), the 70% price premium keeps DDR2 in demand. With the added economic pressures of the world economy and cautious growth outlook of manufacturing sector, the cross-over from DDR2 to DDR3 will come at a significant cost: either to the consumer or the supplier.

Until the cross-over, DDR2-based systems will continue to be a favorite in price sensitive applications (i.e. where total system cost plays a significant role in purchasing decisions.) As an example of this economic inequality, let’s take the HP DL380 G6 and DL385 G6 as a comparison. Adding 16GB to the DL380 adds about $760 to the price tag (4x4GB DDR3-1066), while adding the same amount of memory to the DL385 adds only $410 (4x4GB DDR2-800). This comparison demonstrates an 85% price premium of DDR3 versus DDR2, a bit higher (percentage wise) than the desktop norm of 70%.

SOLORI’s Take: While the cost of memory in desktop systems typically represents a small portion of the overall system cost, the same can not be said for virtualization systems where entry configurations weigh-in at 16GB and often run from 48GB to 72GB in “fully loaded” systems. This, as our calculus has shown, is where the sweet-spot of $/VM is delivered.

In such configurations, the cost of DDR3 memory can tripple the system cost ($6,370 for 2P, L5506 w/12x4GB DDR3-1066R vs. $5,201 for 2P 2427 w/12x4GB DDR2-800). Moving to the higher memory footprint in 2P systems is typically not cost effective because core count cannot keep-up with the memory needs of the virtual machine inventory. However, if it were possible to utilize additional memory in the 2P platform, our benchmark 8GB DDR3-1066 versus DDR2-667 price comparison tells another story. At $900/stick, the cost of 8GB DDR3 is still a 235% premium over 8GB DDR2, making 96GB DDR3 systems (2P Xeon w/HT) nearly $6,200 per server more costly than their DDR2 counterparts (2P Istanbul) based on memory pricing alone.

SOLORI’s 2nd Take: We’re hoping to see Tyan and Supermicro release SR5690 chipset-based systems – promised in Q3/2009 – to take advantage of this pricing trend and round-out the Istanbul offering before Q1/2010 ushers-in the next wave of multi-core systems. With 10G prices on the decline, we think today’s virtualization applications make Istanbul+IOMMU a good price-performance and price-feature fit in the 32-64GB memory footprint space, leaving Nehalem-EP with only the performance niche to its credit. The only question is: where is SR5690?

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Tyan S8212 Spotted

June 26, 2009
Tyan S8212 Istanbul SR5890+SP5100 Motherboard

Tyan S8212 Istanbul SR5690+SP5100 Motherboard

Thanks to a tweet from @ErikBussink and the quick thinking of Charlie Demerjian at SemiAccurate we’ve been treated to a picture of the upcoming Tyan S8212 (2-way) based on AMD’s new line-up of motherboard chip sets. While we see a x16 and 3 x8 PCIe slots, 6 SATA and 8 SAS ports, there is (conspicuously) no 10GE LOM – just 1GE.

What this board does deliver is HT3.0 and IOMMU support for Opteron/Istanbul and that’s a good thing for virtualization. We know from earlier discussions with AMD that Istanbul needs the SR5890 SR5690 to unlock its hidden potential. Two internal USB ports cry-out for flash booting options…

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AMD Istanbul Launch: Shipping Today

June 1, 2009
AMD Opteron "Istanbul" 6-core processor die

AMD Opteron "Istanbul" 6-core processor die

June 1, 2009 – Today, AMD is announcing the general availability of its new single-die, 6-core Opteron processor code named “Istanbul.” We have weighed-in on the promised benefits of Istanbul based on pre-release material that was not under non-disclosure protections. Now, we’re able to disclose the rest of the story.

First, we got a chance to talk to Mike Goddard, AMD Server Products CTO, to discuss Istanbul and how G34/C32 platforms are shaping-up. According to Goddard,”things went really well with Istanbul; it’s no big secret that the silicon we’re using in Istanbul is the same silicon we’re using in Magny-Cours.” Needless to say, there are many more forward-thinking capabilities in Istanbul than can be supported in Socket-F’s legacy chipsets.

“We had always been planning a refresh to Socket-F with 5690,” says Goddard, “but Istanbul got pulled-in beyond our ability to pull-in the chipset.” Consequently, while there could be Socket-F platforms based on the next-generation 5690/5100 chipset, Goddard suggests that “most OEM’s will realign their platform development around [G34/C32, Q1/2010].”

In common parlance, Istanbul is a “genie in a bottle,” and we won’t see its true potential until it resurfaces in its Magny-Cours/G34 configuration. However, at few of these next-generation tweaks will trickle-down to Socket-F systems:

  • AMD PowerCap Manager (via BIOS extensions)
  • Enhanced AMD PowerNow! Technology
  • AMD CoolCore Technology extended to L3 cache
  • HT Assist (aka probe filter) for increase memory bandwidth
  • HT 3.0 with increase to 4.8GT/sec and IMC improvements
  • 5 new part SKUs
  • Better 2P Performance Parity with Nehalem-EP

That’s in addition to 50% more cores in the same power envelope: not an insignificant improvement. In side-by-side comparisons to “Shanghai” quad-core at the same clock frequency, Istanbul delivers 2W lower idle power and 34% better SPECpower ssj_2008 (1,297 overall) results using identical systems with just a processor swap. In fact, the only time Istanbul exceeded Shanghai’s average power envelope was at 80% actual load and beyond – remaining within 5% of the Shanghai even at 100% load. Read the rest of this entry ?