Posts Tagged ‘nested virtualization’

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In-the-Lab: Full ESX/vMotion Test Lab in a Box, Part 4

August 26, 2009

In Part 3 of this series we showed how to install and configure a basic NexentaStor VSA using iSCSI and NFS storage. We also created a CIFS bridge for managing ISO images that are available to our ESX servers using NFS. We now have a fully functional VSA with working iSCSI target (unmounted as of yet) and read-only NFS export mounted to the hardware host.

In this segment, Part 4, we will create an ESXi instance on NFS along with an ESX instance on iSCSI, and, using writable snapshots, turn both of these installations into quick-deploy templates. We’ll then mount our large iSCSI target (created in Part 3) and NFS-based ISO images to all ESX/ESXi hosts (physical and virtual), and get ready to install our vCenter virtual machine.

Part 4, Making an ESX Cluster-in-a-Box

With a lot of things behind us in Parts 1 through 3, we are going to pick-up the pace a bit. Although ZFS snapshots are immediately available in a hidden “.zfs” folder for each snapshotted file system, we are going to use cloning and mount the cloned file systems instead.

Cloning allows us to re-use a file system as a template for a copy-on-write variant of the source. By using the clone instead of the original, we can conserve storage because only the differences between the two file systems (the clone and the source) are stored to disk. This process allows us to save time as well, leveraging “clean installations” as starting points (templates) along with their associate storage (much like VMware’s linked-clone technology for VDI.) While VMware’s “template” capability allows us save time by using a VM as a “starting point” it does so by copying storage, not cloning it, and therefore conserves no storage.

Using clones in NexentaStor to aid rapid deployment and testing.

Using clones in NexentaStor to conserve storage and aid rapid deployment and testing. Only the differences between the source and the clone require additional storage on the NexentaStor appliance.

While the ESX and ESXi use cases might not seem the “perfect candidates” for cloning in a “production” environment, in the lab it allows for an abundance of possibilities in regression and isolation testing. In production you might find that NFS and iSCSI boot capabilities could make cloned hosts just as effective for deployment and backup as they are in the lab (but that’s another blog).

Here’s the process we will continue with for this part in the lab series:

  1. Create NFS folder in NexentaStor for the ESXi template and share via NFS;
  2. Modify the NFS folder properties in NexentaStor to:
    1. limit access to the hardware ESXi host only;
    2. grant the hardware ESXi host “root” access;
  3. Create a folder in NexentaStor for the ESX template and create a Zvol;
  4. From VI Client’s “Add Storage…” function, we’ll add the new NFS and iSCSI volumes to the Datastore;
  5. Create ESX and ESXi clean installations in these “template” volumes as a cloning source;
  6. Unmount the “template” volumes using the VI Client and unshare them in NexentaStore;
  7. Clone the “template” Zvol and NFS file systems using NexentaStore;
  8. Mount the clones with VI Client and complete the ESX and ESXi installations;
  9. Mount the main Zvol and ISO storage to ESX and ESXi as primary shared storage;
Basic storage architecture for the ESX-on-ESX lab.

Basic storage architecture for the ESX-on-ESX lab.

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