Posts Tagged ‘Microsoft’

h1

Quick Take: Q1 DRAM Price Follow-up, 8GB DDR3 Below Target

March 3, 2010

In September 2009 we predicted that average 8GB DIMM prices (DDR2 and DDR3) would reach $565/stick by year end (with DDR3 being higher than DDR2) and at now we’re seeing the reversal of fortunes for DDR2. At year end, the average price for benchmark DDR2/DDR3 was $591 retail, with promotional pricing pushing that below$550 as predicted. Today, we’re seeing DDR3 begin to overtake DDR2 in the 8GB ECC category, dropping below $510/stick, while DDR2 climbs to $550/stick (promotional, on $625/stick retail.)

In 4GB ECC configurations, DDR2 enjoys only a slight retail advantage (13%) while promotional pricing (likely due to inventory reduction initiatives) are providing a bit better value short term. However, the price gap is only 1/2 the power gap, with DDR3 delivering a greater than 35% reduction in power over its DDR2 equivalent (about $1.25/year/stick at $0.10/kWh). The honeymoon is almost over for DDR2.

Benchmark Server (Spot) Memory Pricing – Dual Rank DDR2 Only
DDR2 Reg. ECC Series (1.8V) Price Jun ’09 Price Sep ’09 Price Dec ’09 Price Mar ’10

KVR800D2D4P6/4G
4GB 800MHz DDR2 ECC Reg with Parity CL6 DIMM Dual Rank, x4
(5.400W operating)
$100.00 $117.00
up 17%
$140.70
up 23% promo
$128.90

($151 retail)

KVR667D2D4P5/4G
4GB 667MHz DDR2 ECC Reg with Parity CL5 DIMM Dual Rank, x4 (5.940W operating)
$80.00 $103.00
up 29%
$97.99
down 5%
$128.74

($149 retail)

KVR667D2D4P5/8G
8GB 667MHz DDR2 ECC Reg with Parity CL5 DIMM Dual Rank, x4 (7.236W operating)
$396.00 $433.00 $433.00 (promo) $550.00
(Promo price, retail $625)
Benchmark Server (Spot) Memory Pricing – Dual Rank DDR3 Only
DDR3 Reg. ECC Series (1.5V) Price Jun ’09 Price Sep ’09 Price Dec ’09 Price Mar ’10

KVR1333D3D4R9S/4G
4GB 1333MHz DDR3 ECC Reg w/Parity CL9 DIMM Dual Rank, x4 w/Therm Sen (3.960W operating)
$138.00 $151.00
up 10%
$135.99
down 10%

$150.74

($170 retail)

KVR1066D3D4R7S/4G
4GB 1066MHz DDR3 ECC Reg w/Parity CL7 DIMM Dual Rank, x4 w/Therm Sen (5.085W operating)
$132.00 $151.00
up 15%
$137.59
down 9% (promo)
$150.74
($170 retail)

KVR1066D3D4R7S/8G
8GB 1066MHz DDR3 ECC Reg w/Parity CL7 DIMM Dual Rank, x4 w/Therm Sen (4.110W operating)
$1035.00 $917.00 down 11.5% $667.00
down 28%
$506.59

(retail $584, avail. 3/15)

KVR1333D3D4R9S/8GHA
8GB 1333MHz DDR3 ECC Reg CL9 DIMM 2R x4 w/TS Server Hynix A (4.635W operating)
$584.00

SOLORI’s Take: With strong DDR3 demand and short-falls in DDR2 supply (according to DRAMeXchange), the only thing keeping DDR3 prices above DDR2 at this point is demand and inventory. As Q2/2010 introduces a rush of new workstation and server products based on DDR3 systems, the DRAM production ramp will eventually stabilize demand somewhere towards the end of Q3/2010. Meanwhile, technology companies like VMware, Microsoft, Intel and AMD are betting on new infrastructure spending on operating systems, virtualization and hardware refresh to drive-up economic market factors. If the global economic crisis deepens, this anticipated spending spree could be short-lived and its impact shallow.

h1

Quick Take: Red Hat and Microsoft Virtual Inter-Op

October 9, 2009

This week Red Hat and Microsoft announced support of certain of their OSes as guests in their respective hypervisor implementations: Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) and Hyper-V, respectively. This comes on the heels of Red Hat’s Enterprise Server 5.4 announcement last month.

KVM is Red Hat’s new hypervisor that leverages the Linux kernel to accelerate support for hardware and capabilities. It was Red Hat and AMD that first demonstrated live migration between AMD and Intel-based hypervisors using KVM late last year – then somewhat of a “Holy Grail” of hypervisor feats. With nearly a year of improvements and integration into their Red Hat Enterprise Server and Fedora “free and open source” offerings, Red Hat is almost ready to strike-out in a commercially viable way.

Microsoft now officially supports the following Red Hat guest operating systems in Hyper-V:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2, 5.3 and 5.4

Red Hat likewise officially supports the following Microsoft quest operating systems in KVM:

Windows Server 2003, 2008 and 2008 R2

The goal of the announcement and associated agreements between Red Hat and Microsoft was to enable a fully supported virtualization infrastructure for enterprises with Red Hat and Microsoft assets. As such, Microsoft and Red Hat are committed to supporting their respective products whether the hypervisor environment is all Red Hat, all Hyper-V or totally heterogeneous – mixing Red Hat KVM and Microsoft Hyper-V as necessary.

“With this announcement, Red Hat and Microsoft are ensuring their customers can resolve any issues related to Microsoft Windows on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating on Microsoft Hyper-V, regardless of whether the problem is related to the operating system or the virtualization implementation.”

Red Hat press release, October 7, 2009

Many in the industry cite Red Hat’s adoption of KVM as a step backwards [from Xen] requiring the re-development of significant amount of support code. However, Red Hat’s use of libvirt as a common management API has allowed the change to happen much more rapidly that critics assumptions had allowed. At Red Hat Summit 2009, key Red Hat officials were keen to point out just how tasty their “dog food” is:

Tim Burke, Red Hat’s vice president of engineering, said that Red Hat already runs much of its own infrastructure, including mail servers and file servers, on KVM, and is working hard to promote KVM with key original equipment manufacturer partners and vendors.

And Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens pointed out in his Summit keynote that with KVM inside the Linux kernel, Red Hat customers will no longer have to choose which applications to virtualize; virtualization will be everywhere and the tools to manage applications will be the same as those used to manage virtualized guests.

Xen vs. KVM, by Pam Derringer, SearchDataCenter.com

For system integrators and virtual infrastructure practices, Red Hat’s play is creating opportunities for differentiation. With a focus on light-weight, high-performance, I/O-driven virtualization applications and no need to support years-old established processes that are dragging on Xen and VMware, KVM stands to leap-frog the competition in the short term.

SOLORI’s Take: This news is good for all Red Hat and Microsoft customers alike. Indeed, it shows that Microsoft realizes that its licenses are being sold into the enterprise whether or not they run on physical hardware. With 20+:1 consolidation ratios now common, that represents a 5:1 license to hardware sale for Microsoft, regardless of the hypervisor. With KVM’s demonstrated CPU agnostic migration capabilities, this opens the door to an even more diverse virtualization infrastructure than ever before.

On the Red Hat side, it demonstrates how rapidly Red Hat has matured its offering following the shift to KVM earlier this year. While KVM is new to Red Hat, it is not new to Linux or aggressive early adopters since being added to the Linux kernel as of 2.6.20 back in September of 2007. With support already in active projects like ConVirt (VM life cycle management), OpenNebula (cloud administration tools), Ganeti, and Enomaly’s Elastic Computing Platform, the game of catch-up for Red Hat and KVM is very likely to be a short one.

h1

Quick Take: Battle for the Presentation Layer

March 18, 2009

The battle lines are drawn in the war to determine who will control your desktop in the future – and it’s not about what operating system (OS) you’ll be running – it’s about who will pull the virtual strings behind the OS. Up to recently, Windows users had RDP and ICA as the main “enterprise” desktop remote access services along with a protocol soup of new alternatives.

Today, there is a foray of alternate access technologies flying the banner of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) and a confusing mess of protocols, features and limitations. Most recently, this even includes traditionally security focused Symantec and its “Endpoint Virtualization” product. While this serves to bolster our prediction of a Microsoft/Citrix merger – based on the sheer number of vectors competing for the platform – it also presents a familiar case of “who’s approach will win” for end users and adopters.

Brian Madden’s blog recently touched on this competition and where the major players – in his opinion – stand to lose and gain. It’s worth the read as are the related posts from his blog on the topic.

SOLORI’s take: this war’s been brewing for some time now, and it’s only going to get ugly before things settle down. So far, it’s all packaging and management with no new vision towards an “innovative way” of application deployment – just better ways…