Posts Tagged ‘live migration’

h1

Quick Take: VirtualBox adds Live Migra… uh, Teleportation

November 30, 2009

Sun announced the 3.1.0 release of its desktop hypervisor – VirtualBox – with their own version of live virtual machine host migration called “Teleporting.” Teleporting, according to the user’s manual, is defined as:

“moving a virtual machine over a network from one VirtualBox host to another, while the virtual machine is running. This works regardless of the host operating system that is running on the hosts: you can teleport virtual machines between Solaris and Mac hosts, for example.”

Teleportation operates like an in-place replacement of a VM’s facilities, requiring that the “target” host has a virtual machine in VirtualBox with exactly the same hardware settings as the “source” VM. The source and target VM’s must also share the same storage, etc. and must use either the same VirtualBox accessible iSCSI targets or some other network storage (NFS or SMB/CIFS) – and no snapshots.

“The hosts must have fairly similar CPUs. While VirtualBox can simulate some CPU features to a degree, this does not always work. Teleporting between Intel and AMD CPUs will probably fail with an error message.”

The recipe for teleportation begins on the target and is given in an example, leveraging VirtualBox’s VBoxManage command syntax:

VBoxManage modifyvm  --teleporter on --teleporterport

On the source, the running virtual machine is modified according to the following:

VBoxManage controlvm  teleport --host  --port

For testing, same-host teleportation is allowed (source and target equal loopback). Obviously a ready and clean-up script would be involved to copy the settings to a target location, provide the teleport maintenance and clean-up the former VM configuration that is obsoleted in the teleportation. In the case of an error, the running VM stays running on the source host, and the target VM fails to initialize.

SOLORI’s Take: This represents the writing on the wall for VMware and vMotion. Perhaps the shift from VMotion to vMotion telegraphs the reduced value VMware already sees in the “now standard” feature. Adding vMotion to vSphere Essentials and Essentials Plus would garner a lot of adoption from the SMB market that is moving quickly to Hyper-V over Citrix and VMware. With VirtualBox’s obvious play in desktop virtualization – where minimalist live migration features would be less of a burden – VMware’s market could quickly become divided in 2010 with some crafty third-party integration along with open VDI. It’s a ways off, but the potential is there…

h1

Quick Take: Red Hat and Microsoft Virtual Inter-Op

October 9, 2009

This week Red Hat and Microsoft announced support of certain of their OSes as guests in their respective hypervisor implementations: Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) and Hyper-V, respectively. This comes on the heels of Red Hat’s Enterprise Server 5.4 announcement last month.

KVM is Red Hat’s new hypervisor that leverages the Linux kernel to accelerate support for hardware and capabilities. It was Red Hat and AMD that first demonstrated live migration between AMD and Intel-based hypervisors using KVM late last year – then somewhat of a “Holy Grail” of hypervisor feats. With nearly a year of improvements and integration into their Red Hat Enterprise Server and Fedora “free and open source” offerings, Red Hat is almost ready to strike-out in a commercially viable way.

Microsoft now officially supports the following Red Hat guest operating systems in Hyper-V:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2, 5.3 and 5.4

Red Hat likewise officially supports the following Microsoft quest operating systems in KVM:

Windows Server 2003, 2008 and 2008 R2

The goal of the announcement and associated agreements between Red Hat and Microsoft was to enable a fully supported virtualization infrastructure for enterprises with Red Hat and Microsoft assets. As such, Microsoft and Red Hat are committed to supporting their respective products whether the hypervisor environment is all Red Hat, all Hyper-V or totally heterogeneous – mixing Red Hat KVM and Microsoft Hyper-V as necessary.

“With this announcement, Red Hat and Microsoft are ensuring their customers can resolve any issues related to Microsoft Windows on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating on Microsoft Hyper-V, regardless of whether the problem is related to the operating system or the virtualization implementation.”

Red Hat press release, October 7, 2009

Many in the industry cite Red Hat’s adoption of KVM as a step backwards [from Xen] requiring the re-development of significant amount of support code. However, Red Hat’s use of libvirt as a common management API has allowed the change to happen much more rapidly that critics assumptions had allowed. At Red Hat Summit 2009, key Red Hat officials were keen to point out just how tasty their “dog food” is:

Tim Burke, Red Hat’s vice president of engineering, said that Red Hat already runs much of its own infrastructure, including mail servers and file servers, on KVM, and is working hard to promote KVM with key original equipment manufacturer partners and vendors.

And Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens pointed out in his Summit keynote that with KVM inside the Linux kernel, Red Hat customers will no longer have to choose which applications to virtualize; virtualization will be everywhere and the tools to manage applications will be the same as those used to manage virtualized guests.

Xen vs. KVM, by Pam Derringer, SearchDataCenter.com

For system integrators and virtual infrastructure practices, Red Hat’s play is creating opportunities for differentiation. With a focus on light-weight, high-performance, I/O-driven virtualization applications and no need to support years-old established processes that are dragging on Xen and VMware, KVM stands to leap-frog the competition in the short term.

SOLORI’s Take: This news is good for all Red Hat and Microsoft customers alike. Indeed, it shows that Microsoft realizes that its licenses are being sold into the enterprise whether or not they run on physical hardware. With 20+:1 consolidation ratios now common, that represents a 5:1 license to hardware sale for Microsoft, regardless of the hypervisor. With KVM’s demonstrated CPU agnostic migration capabilities, this opens the door to an even more diverse virtualization infrastructure than ever before.

On the Red Hat side, it demonstrates how rapidly Red Hat has matured its offering following the shift to KVM earlier this year. While KVM is new to Red Hat, it is not new to Linux or aggressive early adopters since being added to the Linux kernel as of 2.6.20 back in September of 2007. With support already in active projects like ConVirt (VM life cycle management), OpenNebula (cloud administration tools), Ganeti, and Enomaly’s Elastic Computing Platform, the game of catch-up for Red Hat and KVM is very likely to be a short one.

h1

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization Strategy

June 26, 2009

Red Hat’s recently updated virtualization strategy has resulted in an “oversubscribed” beta program. The world leader in open source solutions swings a big stick with its kernel-based virtualization products. Some believe one of the keys to successful large scale cloud initiatives is an open source hypervisor, and with Xen going commercial, turning to the open source veteran Red Hat seems a logical move. You may recall that Red Hat – using KVM – was the first to demonstrate live migration between AMD and Intel hosts.

“We are very pleased by the welcome we have received from enterprise companies all over the world who are looking to adopt virtualization pervasively and value the benefits of our open source solutions. Our Beta program is oversubscribed. We are excited to be in a position to deliver a flexible, comprehensive and cost-effective virtualization portfolio in which products will share a consistent hardware and software certification portfolio. We are in a unique position to deliver a comprehensive portfolio of virtualization solutions, ranging from a standalone hypervisor to a virtualized operating system to a comprehensive virtualization management product suite.”

Scott Crenshaw, vice president, Platform Business Unit at Red Hat

Red Hat sees itself as an “agent of change” in the virtualization landscape and wants to deliver a cost effective “boxed” approach to virtualization and virtualization management. All of this is hinged on Red Hat’s new KVM-based approach – enabled through their acquisition of Qumranet in September 2008 – which delivers the virtualization and management layers to Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux and its kernel.

Along with Qumranet came Solid ICE and SPICE. Solid ICE is the VDI component running on KVM consisting of a virtual desktop server and controller front end. Solid ICE allows Red Hat to rapidly enter the VDI space without disrupting its Eco-System. Additionally, the SPICE protocol (Simple Protocol for Independent Computing Environments) enables an standardized connection protocol alternative to RDP with enhancements for the VDI user experience.

Red Hat’s SPICE claims to offer the following features in the enterprise:

  • Superior graphics performance (e.g. flash)
  • video quality (30+ frames per second)
  • bi-directional audio (for soft-phones/IP phones)
  • bi-directional video (for video telephony/ video conferencing)
  • No specialized hardware. Software only client that can be automatically installed via Active-X and a browser on the client machine

Red Hat’s virtualization strategy reveals more of it’s capabilities and depth in accompanying blogs and white papers. Adding to the vendor agnostic migration capabilities, Red Hat’s KVM is slated to support VM hosts to 96 cores and 1TB of memory with guests scaling to 16 vCPUs and 64GB of memory. Additional features include high availabitily, live migration, global system scheduler, global power saving (through migration and power down), memory page sharing, thin storage provisioning and SELinux security.

h1

Quick Take: Live Migration with Istanbul

April 1, 2009

As a follow-up to the six-core demonstration referenced in an earlier post, AMD has issued a press release and a related video demonstrating a “three generation” migration in VMware VI3. The key issues for AMD are that a running workload on a “Barcelona” Opteron can migrate to/from a “Shanghai” or “Istanbul” series processor without shutdown (courtesy of VMware’s VMotion).

Another excellent take-away is that – unlike the test mule system used in the previous demonstrations – the system used in the migration demonstration appears to be a Supermicro AS-2021M. Pictured below, this platform demonstration would seem to indicate that Istanbul is close to release.

Ron Myers of AMD migrating from one server to another using VMware ESX 3.5

Ron Myers of AMD migrating from one server to another using VMware ESX 3.5

SOLORI’s take: Previous tests had either involved AMD test mules or HP modular systems. The use of SOLORI Eco-System products in such a demonstration underscores the value of AMD as an Eco-System partner and the longevity of these systems in production.

SOLORI’s 2nd take: With the emergence of Intel’s Nehalem-EP processor and its outstanding pre-release benchmark testing, AMD has a very short window of opportunity to release the Istanbul series to hold its ground. Given some early indications that probe filter boosts memory bandwidth – an issue Nehalem currently leads in – AMD should launch Istanbul with as many optimizing feature as they can, including probe filter.