Posts Tagged ‘g34’

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AMD Chipsets Launched: Fiorano and Kroner Platforms to Follow

September 21, 2009

The Channel Register is reporting on the launch of AMD’s motherboard chipsets which will drive new socket-F based Fiorano and Kroner platforms as well as the socket G34 and C32 based Maranello and San Marino platforms. The Register also points out that no tier one PC maker is announcing socket-F solutions based on the new chipsets today. However, motherboard and “barebones” maker Supermicro is also announcing new A+ server, blade and workstation variants using the new AMD SR5690 and SP5100 chipsets, enabling:

  • GPU-optimized designs: Support up to four double-width GPUs along with two CPUs and up to 3 additional high-performance add-on cards.
  • Up to 10 quad-processor (MP) or dual-processor (DP) Blades in a 7U enclosure: Industry-leading density and power efficiency with up to 240 processor cores and 640GB memory per 7U enclosure.
  • 6Gb/s SAS 2.0 designs: Four-socket and two-socket server and workstation solutions with double the data throughput of previous generation storage architectures.
  • Universal I/O designs: Provide flexible I/O customization and investment protection.
  • QDR InfiniBand support option: Integrated QDR IB switch and UIO add-on card solution for maximum I/O performance.
  • High memory capacity: 16 DIMM models with high capacity memory support to dramatically improve memory and virtualization performance.
  • PCI-E 2.0 Slots plus Dual HT Links (HT3) to CPUs: Enhance motherboard I/O bandwidth and performance. Optimal for QDR IB card support.
  • Onboard IPMI 2.0 support: Reduces remote management costs.

Eco-Systems based on Supermicro’s venerable AS2021M – based on the NVidia nForce Pro 3600 chipset – can now be augmented with the Supermicro AS2021A variant based on AMD’s SR5690/SP5100 pairing. Besides offering HT3.0 and on-board Winbond WPCM450 KVM/IP BMC module, the new iteration includes support for the SR5690’s IOMMU function (experimentally supported by VMware), 16 DDR2 800/667/533 DIMMs, and four PCI-E 2.0 slots – all in the same, familiar 2U chassis with eight 3.5″ hot-swap bays.

AMD’s John Fruehe outlines AMD’s market approach for the new chipsets in his “AMD at Work” blog today. Based on the same basic logic/silicon, the SR5690, SR5670 and SR5650 all deliver PCI-E 2.0 and HT3.0 but at differing levels of power consumption and PCI Express lanes to their respective platforms. Paired with appropriate “power and speed” Opteron variant, these platforms offer system designers, virtualization architects and HPC vendors greater control over price-performance and power-performance constraints that drive their respective environments.

AMD chose the occasion of the Embedded Systems Conference in Boston to announce its new chipset to the world. Citing performance-per-watt advantages that could enhance embedded systems in the telecom, storage and security markets, AMD’s press release highlighted three separate vendors with products ready to ship based on the new AMD chipsets.

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Quick Take: 6-core “Gulftown” Nehalem-EP Spotted, Tested

August 10, 2009

TechReport is reporting on a Taiwanese overclocker who may be testing a pair of Nehalem 6-core processors (2P) slated for release early in 2010. Likewise, AlienBabelTech mentions a Chinese website, HKEPC, that has preliminary testing completed on the desktop (1P) variant of the 6-core. While these could be different 32nm silicon parts, it is more likely – judging from the CPU-Z outputs and provided package pictures – that these are the same sample SKUs tested as 1P and 2P LGA-1366 components.

CPUzWhat does this mean for AMD and the only 6-core shipping today? Since Intel’s still projecting Q2/2010 for the server part, AMD has a decent opportunity to grow market share for Istanbul. Intel’s biggest rival will be itself – facing a wildly growing number of SKU’s in across its i-line from i5, i7, i8 and i9 “families” with multiple speed and feature variants. Clearly, the non-HT version would stand as a direct competitor to Istanbul’s native 6-core SKUs. Likewise, Istanbul may be no match for the 6-core Nehalem with HT and “turbo core” feature set.

However, with an 8-core “Beckton” Nehalem variant on the horizon, it might be hard to understand just where the Gulftown fits in Intel’s picture. Intel faces a serious production issue, filling fab capacity with 4-core, 6-core and 8-core processors, each with speed, power, socket and HT variants from which to supply high-speed, high-power SKUs and lower-speed, low-power SKUs for 1P, 2P and 4P+ destinations. Doing the simple math with 3 SKU’s per part Intel would be offering the market a minimum of 18 base parts according to their current marketing strategy: 9 with HT/turbo, 9 without HT/turbo. For socket LGA-1366, this could easily mean 40+ SKUs with 1xQPI and 2xQPI variants included (up from 23).

SOLORI’s take: Intel will have to create some interesting “crippling or pricing tricks” to keep Gulftown from canibalizing the Gainstown market. If they follow their “normal” play book, we prodict the next 10-months will play out like this:

  1. Initially there will be no 8-core product for 1P and 2P systems (LGA-1366), allowing for artificially high margins on the 8-core EX chip (LGA-1567), slowing the enevitable canibalization of the 4-core/2P market, and easing production burdens;
  2. Intel will silently and abruptly kill Itanium in favor of “hyper-scale” Nehalem-EX variants;
  3. Gulftown will remain high-power (90-130W TDP) and be positioned against AMD’s G34 systems and Magny-Cours – plotting 12-core against 12-thread;
  4. Intel creates a “socket refresh” (LGA-1566?) to enable “inexpensive” 2P-4P platforms from its Gulftown/Beckton line-up in 2H/2010 (ostensibly to maintain parity with G34) without hurting EX;
  5. Revised, lower-power variants of Gainstown will be positioned against AMD’s C32 target market;
  6. Intel will cut SKUs in favor of higher margins, increasing speed and features for “same dollar” cost;
  7. Non-HT parts will begin to disappear in 4-core configurations completely;
  8. Intel’s AES enhancements in Gulftown will allow it to further differentiate itself in storage and security markets;

It would be a mistake for Intel to continue growing SKU count or provide too much overlap between 4-core HT and 6-core non-HT offerings. If purchasing trends soften in 4Q/09 and remain (relatively) flat through 2Q/10, Intel will benefit from a leaner, well differentiated line-up. AMD has already announced a “leaner” plan for G34/C32. If all goes well at the fabs, 1H/2010 will be a good ole fashioned street fight between blue and green.

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Server Watch: Istanbul, G34, C32, Itanium and Nehalem-EX

May 29, 2009
Istanbul is launching in June, 2009 and will be a precursor to the G34 and C32 platforms to come in Q1/2010. To that end, AMD will be providing an overview of its next generation of Direct Connect Architecture, or DCA 2.0, which which separates Socket-F systems from G34/C32. This overview will be available as a live webcast on June 1, 2009 at 11:00AM Central Time. In advance of the announcement, AMD has (silently) reduced prices for its Opteron processors across the board. This move will place additional pressure on Intel’s Nehalem-EP systems already weakened (virtualization) price-performance.

We expect to hear more news about Istanbul’s availability in keeping with Tyan’s upcoming announcement next week. Based on current technology and economic trends, Istanbul and G34 could offer AMD a solid one-two punch to counter Intel’s relentless “tick-tock” pace. With Nehalem servers sales weak despite early expectations and compounding economic pressures, market timing may be more ideally suited for AMD’s products than Intel’s for a change. As Gartner puts it, “the timing of Nehalem is a bit off, and it probably won’t make much of an impact this year.”

In the meantime, Phil Hughes at AMD has a posted a personal reflection on Opteron’s initial launch, starting with the IBM e325 in 2003, and ending with Opteron’s impact on the Intel Itanium market by year-end (while resisting a reference to “the sinking of the Itanic“). Phil acknowledges Sun’s influence on Opteron and links to some news articles from 2003. See his full post, “The Sun Also Rises,” here… As 64-bit processors go, 2003 was much more the year of the Opteron rather than “the year of the Itanium” (as predicted by Intel’s Paul Otellini.)

Speaking of Itanium, TechWorld has an article outlining how Intel’s upcoming Nehalem-EX – with the addition of MCA technology derived from Itanium – could bring an end to the beleagered proprietary platform. TechWorld cites Insight 64 analyst Nathan Brookwood as saying the new Xeon will finally break Intel’s policy of artificially crippling of the x86 processor which has prevented Xeon from being competitive with Itanium. The 8-core, SMT-enabled EX processor was being demonstrated by IBM in an 8-socket configuration.