Posts Tagged ‘bl490c G6’

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Quick Take: HP Blade Tops 8-core VMmark w/OC’d Memory

September 25, 2009

HP’s ProLiant BL490c G6 server blade now tops the VMware VMmark table for 8-core systems – just squeaking past rack servers from Lenovo and Dell with a score of 24.54@17 tiles: a new 8-core record. The half-height blade was equipped with two, quad-core Intel Xeon X5570 (Nehalem-EP, 130W TDP) and 96GB ECC Registered DDR3-1333 (12x 8GB, 2-DIMM/channel) memory.

In our follow-up, we found that HP’s on-line configuration tool does not allow for DDR3-1333 memory so we went to the street for a comparison. For starters, we examined the on-line price from HP with DDR3-1066 memory and the added QLogic QMH2462 Fiber Channel adapter ($750) and additional NC360m dual-port Gigabit Ethernet controller ($320) which came to a grand total of $28,280 for the blade (about $277/VM, not including Blade chassis or SAN storage).

Stripping memory from the build-out results in a $7,970 floor to the hardware, sans memory. Going to the street to find 8GB sticks with DDR3-1333 ratings and HP support yielded the Kingston KTH-PL313K3/24G kit (3x 8GB DIMMs) of which we would need three to complete the build-out.  At $4,773 per kit, the completed system comes to $22,289 (about $218/VM, not including chassis or storage) which may do more to demonstrate Kingston’s value in the market place rather than HP’s penchant for “over-priced” memory.

Now, the interesting disclosure from HP’s testing team is this:

Notes from HP's VMmark submission.

Notes from HP's VMmark submission.

While this appears to boost memory performance significantly for HP’s latest run (compared to the 24.24@17 tiles score back in May, 2009) it does so at the risk of running the Nehalem-EP memory controller out of specification – essentially, driving the controller beyond the rated load. It is hard for us to imagine that this specific configuration would be vendor supported if used in a problematic customer installation.

SOLORI’s Take:Those of you following closely may be asking yourselves: “Why did HP choose to over-clock the  memory controller in this run by pushing a 1066MHz, 2DPC limit to 1333MHz?”  It would appear the answer is self-evident: the extra 6% was needed to put them over the Lenovo machine. This issue raises a new question about the VMmark validation process: “Should out of specification configurations be allowed in the general benchmark corpus?” It is our opinion that VMmark should represent off-the-shelf, fully-supported configurations only – not esoteric configuration tweaks and questionable over-clocking practices.

Should there be as “unlimited” category in the VMmark arena? Who knows? How many enterprises knowingly commit their mission critical data and processes to systems running over-clocked processors and over-driven memory controllers? No hands? That’s what we thought… Congratulations anyway to HP for clawing their way to the top of the VMmark 8-core heap…