Posts Tagged ‘apple a5’

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Quick-Take: iPad2 Launched, Features Left on the Drawing Board

March 2, 2011

The iPad2, Available in "Black or White" on March 11, 2011

No doubt that Apple is the 800lb gorilla in the room when it comes to mobile tablets and phones today. With lack-lustre acceptance of the first “official” Android tablet – Motorola’s Xoom – the new aspects of the Apple iPad2, announced today, will surely keep iPad adopters on-board for the next version. Coming March 11, 2011, the new iPad will come in three memory sizes (16, 32 and 64GB) and be available as an WiFi-only variant (802.11a/b/g/n) as well as a Wi-Fi+3G+aGPS variant (UMTS/HSDPA/HSUPA/GSM/EDGE or CDMA/EV-DO Rev. A) – both with Bluetooth 2.1+EDR.

Besides coming in a “white” model from “day one,” the iPad2 sports the anticipated Apple A5 dual-core system on chip based on the ARM Cortex-A9 CPU. The 9.7 inch LED-backlit multi-touch display features the coveted IPS display technology that gave the original iPad such great color. Additionally, the iPad2 joins the iPhone4 in the dual-camera club with a front-facing VGA camera (suitable for FaceTime) and a rear-facing HD camera (suitable for 720p, 30 fps video).

Apple's HDMI "mirroring" connector includes pass-through 30-pin port for charging.

Rounding-out the features include HDMI output via proprietary 30-pin to HDMI+30-pin adapter (dongle) supporting video to 1080p. Missing from the “dreamed about” feature list are: high-resolution display, removable media, standard USB ports,  autonomous GPS and near field communications interface. At 0.34 inches thick and 1.33 lbs, the iPad2 shed 0.17 lbs and 0.16 inches in thickness by removing the additional display glass, but it kept the original’s 1024×768 display – a slip behind the standard 1280×800 display profile of Honeycomb-wielding 10″ tablets.

Out of the gate, iPad2 versions will be available for AT&T and Verizon Wireless in the US (although specific launch dates for either carrier are not yet available). The iPad in Business section of the release site looks impressive on the surface. The existing list of business oriented applications for iPad together with the obvious polish of the product represents a real obstacle for its competitors (like QNX-based Blackberry Playbook and Android-based Motorola Xoom).

SOLORI’s Take: The iPad2 represents a conservative update to the existing and wildly successful iPad (over 10M units in 2H 2010). Loyalist iPad users are early adopters, so it’s a no-brainer to predict that 3M iPad2’s will ship in H1/2011 to “iPad1” owners. If it happens, that makes for a solid supply of discarded iPads over the next few months which can actually HELP Apple entrench – giving them an artificial low-end product due to upgrades. Given that there is zero reference to the original iPad on Apple’s site, it’s safe to say that when inventories are gone, iPad2 will be the only game for Apple.

The shortcoming for iPad2 over its Android contenders is physical standards. I mentioned the screen resolution as compared to Android Honeycomb standard, but the Blackberry Playbook comes in under both devices at 1024×600 (last year’s “unofficial” Android tablet standard). While the Playbook is lighter at 0.9 lbs, it’s also smaller (and 0.1″ thicker) – more of a challenger for Galaxy Tab than iPad. Most of the Tegra2 tablets have mini-USB (some have full-size USB) and offer either mini-HDMI or full-size HDMI ports – either on-board or through a docking port. It’s rumoured that Apple has locked-up the IPS display market, but at 1024×768, those opting for higher resolution may turn to Android competitors for more desktop real estate.

Besides matching iPad2 feature-for-feature, Tegra2 Android tablets represent a serious threat (technologically) to iPad2. Another issue is storage: nearly every Android comes with both removable and built-in memory options – something neither iPad or Blackberry offer. In a business world, the ability to quickly exchange data without using WiFi or 3G/4G is huge – especially where remote access applications are concerned. That makes iPad dependent on its wireless carriers and WiFi/hot-spots for data exchange (or docking/undocking to notebook, laptop, etc.) The removable memory feature also allows enterprises to purchase the low-end memory configuration and supplement them with third-party memory or require end-users to supply their own.

Where iPad2 has the biggest advantage is turn-key applications through Apple’s iTunes market, and this is something they’re pressing heavily in today’s marketing message. Forget the clever iPad2 cover, its applications that ultimately make the product valuable to business. If Apple can stay ahead here, enterprise will follow. Unfortunately, Apple may find its “hatred” for Adobe’s Flash a position that could erode its market faster than anything else. Flash could be the great equalizer (or market accelerator) for Android and Blackberry, allowing businesses to rely on web-apps instead of native ones… in the meantime, Google has the clout and growth rate to compel all but the staunchest of application vendors to play both sides of the split market.

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Quick-Take: Google Turns to Zynamics after recent Malware Proof

March 2, 2011

With enterprises eyeing mobile “smart” phones and tablets as the next wave of technology to improve worker productivity, responsiveness and presence, the recent infiltration of trojan malware into Google’s Android Market is likely to go unnoticed. However, the ramifications appear to be crystal clear to Google as they responded by quickly snatching-up German reverse engineering firm Zynamics. In a blog post yesterday, Zynamics’ CEO Thomas Dullien – aka Halvar Flake – simply stated:

We’re pleased to announce that zynamics has been acquired by Google! If you’re an existing customer and do not receive our email announcement within the next 48 hours, please contact us at info@zynamics.com. All press inquiries should be sent to press@google.com.

There is still no official press release from Google on the matter, however SecurityWeek and other sources have stated that Google has indeed confirmed the acquisition. It is unlikely that the timing of this announcement is unrelated to the recent Android Market fiasco or the “rumoured” Apple iPad2 launch supposedly to take place today at 10:00 AM PST.

An estimated 50,000-200,000 users downloaded tainted apps from Google Market before the items were pulled-off the site. Of course, Apple is not without its share of  problems in iPad. There was a major breach in June, 2010 resulting in at least 114,000 compromised iPad users including then Obama White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel.  However, in the iPad case the breach came as a result of a direct attack on iPad vulnerabilities where the Android compromise attacked a weakness in Google’s Market policies – essentially taking a “trusted back door” approach.

Meanwhile, VMware has been on the road promoting it’s mobile virtualization platform with partner LG. In a hands-on video at the 2011 Mobile World Congress taken by Engadget, the VMware mobile hypervisor can be seen fronting two phones within a phone. While this approach can help to secure corporate data from infiltration of the “consumer” side of the schizophrenic cell phone, it cannot protect the phone from OS vulnerabilities (like the iPad Safari weakness) or authorized deployment vectors (like Google’s Market infiltration.) To protect assets from these kind of attacks, the use of mobile anti-virus and anti-malware will be imperative.

SOLORI’s Take: VMware’s type II hypervisor does enable corporate policy enforcement that would bee too “draconian” for most users to co-exist with their personal or mixed-use phone or tablet . While no official word from VMware has been given on when their mobile hypervisor will make the leap from phone to tablet, it’s not a huge leap given the software has already been shown on the Nexus One and LG Optimus Black.

Given that the LG Optimus is based on TI’s Omap 3630 and the Nexus One incorporates the older Qualcomm Snapdragon chipset, and both are based on ARM Cortex-A8 CPU core found in many Android and Apple iOS devices, VMware’s offering appears to be very mature. Also, it is only a type II hypervisor so it should be no time until we see it running on more current, mainstream devices running ARM Cortex-A9 CPUs used in Nvidia Tegra2-based devices like LG Optimus 2X, Motorola Altrix/4G & Xoom or the rumoured Apple A5 chip “destined” for iPad2 and iPhone 5 or even the new TI Omap 4430 that power the like of the Blackberry Playbook.

Can a type II hypervisor quell corporate America’s security concerns about information leakage and IP theft? Given the right deployment model, tools and resources it represents a step in the right direction. The jury’s still out to see how wireless sharing, two separate data plans and two anti-malware threads affect run-time on platforms that threaten the delicate balance of usability and battery life…