Archive for the ‘Cloud’ Category

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Short-Take: vSphere vCloud Suite – Cheat Sheet

August 27, 2012

VMworld 2012 Announcements

VMware announces a new product package based on vCloud Director and vSphere Enterprise Plus called vCloud Suite. Existing users of vSphere Enterprise Plus (with valid SnS as of 8/27/2012) – including Academic and Federal users – may qualify for a “free” upgrade (actually $1/CPU) to “Standard” edition of vCloud Suite. Likewise, users with valid SnS and vSphere Enterprise (not Plus) qualify for a reduced cost upgrade to vCloud Suite Standard at $682/CPU.

Qualifying users have until December 15, 2012 to complete the transaction. Upgrades to other editions of vCloud Suite from Enterprise and Enterprise Plus are available as well – at additional cost per CPU.

vCloud Suite Cheat Sheet

Summary of new vCloud Suite offering and tiers (including links):

vCloud Suite
Standard Advanced Enterprise
Virtualization VMware vSphere Enterprise Plus Edition * * *
Cloud Infrastructure vCloud Director and vCloud Connector * * *
Standard vCloud Networking and Security * * *
Advanced vCloud Networking and Security * *
vCenter Site Recovery Manager Enterprise *
Operations Management vCenter Operations Management Suite vCOps Advanced vCOps Enterprise
VMware vCenter Chargeback Manager™ *
VMware vCenter Configuration Manager™ *
VMware vCenter Infrastructure Navigator™ *
vFabric Application Director *
Licensing Per CPU, Enterprise Plus basis $4,995.00 $7,495.00 $11,495.00
Support Basic: Per CPU, Per Year $1,049.00 $1,574.00 $2,414.00
Production: Per CPU, Per Year $1,249.00 $1,874.00 $2,874.00

Per-VM Pricing All But Gone

The introduction of vCloud Suite side-steps the vCloud Director per-VM licensing model and allows private cloud to scale based on the more predictable per-CPU infrastructure metric. Public cloud service providers will still be interested in per-VM foot prints and billing structures, but at least private cloud can be unshackled from the confines of per-VM vCD and vRAM issues; which segways nicely into the next tidbit…

In Other News…

VMware effectively kills vRAM by including “unlimited” vRAM entitlements in all editions of vSphere.

SMB’s may be pleased to note that VMware also now includes the vSphere Storate Appliance with all acceleration kits except vSphere Essentials at no additional cost (versus vSphere 5.0 kits). This is especially good for ROBO operations using Essentials Plus. The standalone cost for vSphere Storage Appliance is now $3,495.

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Short Take: VMware View Client for Android, ICS Update

May 17, 2012

An updated VMware View Client for Android devices hit a the street today sporting a couple of enhancements for Google’s Android OS running the relatively new Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) version; other improvements are for View 5.1 deployments only.

Here’s a list of the new features in the update available now on Google Play:

– Support for ICS
– Mouse support with hover, right click and scroll wheel (ICS)
– Updated look and feel and improvements for smaller screens
– New Settings dialog includes security mode settings
– Up to 2x better video playback performance
– Optimized for View 5.1
– RADIUS two factor authentication with View 5.1
– Save password option (administrator approval required) with View 5.1
– French, German, Spanish keyboard support with View 5.1

The update is a 5.32MB download, and is available free of charge.

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Short-Take: vSphere Client for iPad, Preview

March 18, 2011

I highlighted the installation and use of VMware’s vCenter Moble Access (vCMA) appliance in a post in late February. For the most part, vCMA has not changed much since our initial download back in April of 2009. If you downloaded the OVF early this February and looked at the updated instructions from the “fling” site, you may have noticed the following “curious” statements:

  • Once it powers on, you will need to configure your iPad by going into Settings, the vSphere client (usually bottom left corner of screen, in the Apps section), then you enter the IP address of your mobile appliance.
  • Finally, you can access your environment from the vSphere iPad app by entering your vCenter server info or ESX server info, with appropriate username and password.

vSphere Client for iPad

Having a heads-up from the vExpert team briefing by Srinivas Krishnamurti, Sr. Director for Mobile Solutions and Marketing at VMware, plus earlier press coverage from VMworld 2010 (see below), I knew what this “information leak” was hailing. Fortunately, the offending section (text above) was quickly redacted and VMware managed to avoid spoiling the surprise pending today’s [press release].

However, that was not the only source of “information leakage” prior to today’s announcement: you just had to know where to look. For instance, while looking deeper into the virtual appliance for our vCMA how-to, I found bread-crumbs pointing to more “curious” iPad wanderings. The following “Easter egg” was discovered in the “action-config.xml” file (which we held back under the spirit of the information embargo):

<!-- VCMA iPad Actions -->
 <action name="vcmaAbout" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaAboutAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaLogin" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaLoginAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaLogout" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaLogoutAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaHome" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaHomeAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaHostInfo" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaHostInfoAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaHostOp" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaHostOperationAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaVmInfo" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaVmInfoAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaVmQuestion" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaVmQuestionAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaVmAnswer" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaVmAnswerAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaVmOp" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaVmOperationAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaSnapshot" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaSnapshotAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaPerf" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaPerfAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaSearch" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaSearchAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaPing" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaPingAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaTracert" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaTraceRouteAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaVmsList" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaVmListAction"></action>
 <action name="vcmaMonitorTask" type="com.vmware.vcma.action.VcmaMonitorTaskAction"></action>

This grouping of action/command definitions identify 17 of 23 vCMA action classes. These classes meant four things to me: (1) the actions are tuned specifically for a non-HTML-only client; (2) the limitations of vCMA’s web interface do not bind the iPad client; (3) there is significant potential for “capabilities drift” between the iPad client the “generic” mobile access client (i.e. HTML) as time goes by (read: richer feature set, user options); and (4) other “tablet” or “mobile” clients can’t be too far behind.

Since it is not feasible to have iPad software previews for vExperts (i.e. via iTunes) for pre-release products, this “pre-view” is based on exposure to product briefing and other pre-launch sources (direct and indirect). We’ll be following-up within the week with actual hands-on experience… That said, here’s what’s going on with VMware and iPad:

vSphere Client for iPad

Today, VMware CIO Steve Herrod announced the launch of version 1.0 of the vSphere Client for iPad (vCiP). The aptly named utility runs on Apple’s current generations of iPad and provides access to many of the basic administrative functions available to vCenter and the standard vSphere Client. This release must be seen as a quick, 1-2-3 punch of mobile and management-centric releases for VMware in the span of two weeks: vCenter Ops, View Client for iPad and now vSphere Client for iPad.

This iPad application is not truly a “native” or “fat” client for vSphere in the “conventional Windows sense.” Instead, VMware’s new app deploys as a web service reliant application (typical of its iPad ilk), and it is accordingly “small, light and elegant.” As you might guess from the [leading] introduction, the “heavy lifting” is actually performed by VMware’s vCenter Mobile Access (vCMA) appliance through the set of new classes (conveniently listed above).

VMware diagram showing (optional) placement of firewall, vCMA, vCenter and vSphere clusters. The use of a VPN connection to your firewall is strongly recommended as vCMA deploys with its web service without SSL enabled.

This illustration depicts the “best practice” recommended deployment for the iPad client by way of a trusted VPN connection. Again, this information was provided to us from Srinivas and his team “pre-launch” and hence was also prior to the recently released enhancements in vCMA (see below). In either case, the connection from iPad to vCenter is always translated through vCMA.

Like the standard Windows “fat” client (now conveniently available as a ThinApp’d zero-install package), the iPad client login requires the following credentials:

  1. The IP address or DNS host name for your vCenter;
  2. A valid user name with rights to access/manage the target vCenter;
  3. The password for the vSphere user.

Unlike the Windows variant, the following must be configured into the iPad’s “Settings” for the vSphere app prior to initial connection:

  1. The IP address or DNS host name for your vCMA appliance (displayed as “Web Server” in “Settings”).

vCMA’s web service is not SSL encrypted, and these credentials could be passed “in the clear.” (see updated post, SSL added to vCMA this Tuesday.) Given this client is targeted for mobile use, the risk of exposure to insecure networks (Internet, public WiFi, etc) without SSL would have created “special” opportunities for man-in-the-middle attacks. However, the use of a mobile VPN connection for the iPad client is strongly recommended, but no longer strictly necessary.

Read the rest of this entry ?

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Short-Take: vCenter Operations, Launched

March 8, 2011

vCenter Operations Standard, Launced Today

I think “launched” is a good description of a product that represents a company’s first release from a product acquisition that was already somewhat mature. No surprising new features, no trend-setting advanced in interface or integration – just a solid, usable “pane of glass” to improve “visibility” into an existing product set. That’s how I’d describe VMware’s “new” vCenter Operations appliance for vSphere.

The product launches initially as a virtual appliance (similar to VMDR, vMA, vCMA, etc.) that enhances vCenter’s ability to track performance, capacity and changes in the vSphere environment. This initial offering is called VMware vCenter Operations Standard and is priced per-VM (I’ll get to those details later.) vCOPS Standard will be available for download and trial beginning March 14, 2011. Here’s how VMware describes it:

Proactively ensure service levels, optimum resource usage and configuration compliance in dynamic virtual and cloud environments with VMware vCenter Operations. Through automated operations management and patented analytics, you benefit from an integrated approach to performance, capacity and configuration management. You’ll gain the intelligence and visibility needed to

  • Get actionable intelligence to automate manual operations processes
  • Gain visibility across infrastructure and applications for rapid problem resolution
  • Proactively ensure optimal resource utilization and virtual/cloud infrastructure performance
  • Get ‘at-a-glance’ views of operational and regulatory compliance across physical and virtual infrastructure.

If you’re like me, that description won’t make you find a place in your strained IT budget for VMware’s new plug-in. Eventually, VMware will find the right messaging to sell this add-on, but let’s see if it can sell itself, shall we? Located deep within a “related whitepaper” there is an indication of how vCOPS differentiates itself from the crowd of “pretty statistics loggers” and delivers some real tasty goodness. I believe this is the real reason why VMware shelled-out $100M for the technology.

Dynamic Thresholds

Yeah, I thought that too. What the heck is a “dynamic threshold” and why do I care? For one thing, it takes VMware two pages of white paper just to describe what a “dynamic threshold” is, let alone describe how it adds value to vCenter. In short, VMware’s statistics logger applies eight proprietary algorithms to live and historical data to “predict” what “normal” operating parameters are for a specific VM, host, cluster, etc. and then make decisions as to whether or not anomalous conditions exist in the present operating state.

vCenter Operations' stats engine tries to see performance data as a seasoned admin would.

Effectively, VMware’s dynamic threshold takes a sophisticated look at the current trend data just like a seasoned IT admin would – except it does it across your entire virtual enterprise every 12 hours and predicts what the next 12 hours should look like. This “prediction” becomes the performance envelope, hour by hour, for the next 12 hours of operation. So long as your virtual object’s performance stays within the envelope, the likelihood of anomalous behaviour is low; however, when it is operating outside the envelope, outliers are likely to trigger performance alarms.

The following transforms are applied to statistical data every 12 hours:

•    An algorithm that can detect linear behaviour patterns (e.g., disk utilization, etc.).
•    An algorithm that can detect metrics that have only two states (e.g., availability measurements).
•    An algorithm that can detect metrics that have a discrete set of values, not a “range” of values, (e.g., “Number of DB User Connections,” “Number of Active JMVs,” etc.).
•    Two different algorithms that can detect cyclical behaviour patterns that are tied to calendar cycles (e.g., weekly, monthly, etc.)
•    Two different algorithms that can detect general non-calendar patterns (e.g., multi-modal)
•    An algorithm that works, not with time-series or frequently measured values, but with sparse data (e.g., daily, weekly, monthly batch data)

VMware claims this approach – to borrow a recently over-used term – “wins” versus typical bell-shape algorithm approaches many times over. In statistical analysis against real-world VM metrics, VMware says typical bell-shape analysis “barely shows up” and, in the few cases where it “wins” the bell-shape approach does so only slightly. In enterprise applications, being able to present “anomalous behaviour” of related systems in opposition can more quickly lead to root-cause identity. Here, VMware demonstrates how anomaly counts for separate, related application tiers can be compared and correlated visually:

Anomaly count comparison across separate tiers. Note "smart alert" gets triggered early in the process (Enterprise Edition).

Eric Sloof at NTPro.NL has posted a video (7 minutes) and screen shots that shows vCenter Operations Standard in operation. While Eric describes vCOPS as a “great new product,” Kendrick Coleman takes issue with VMware’s price model and questions its true value proposition (at least with the “Standard” edition.)

Do Fries Come with That?

From some of the back-peddling overheard in the vExpert pre-launch conference, VMware’s testing the waters on where the product fits at the low-end. Essentially, this is an enterprise class product offering that’s been paired-down to fit into a smaller IT budget. Like most VMware products, a generous “free” trial period will be granted to allow you to try before you buy. However, the introductory price (i.e. official pricing is not posted on VMware’s site) is set at $50/VM (hence Kendrick’s quandary) for up to 500 VMs (about $25K).

Since VMware intends to offer an inclusive pricing scheme, all registered VMs will need to be licensed into the Standard Edition’s footprint. In the vExpert call, there was “talk” about extending analysis only to specific VMs (and allowing for a paired-down licensing footprint) but that is conjecture today. In a typical enterprise where 70-80% of workloads are non-mission critical, the cost and license model for vCOPS could be an obstacle for some – or at least force the use of a separate vCenter and cluster arrangement. Let’s hope VMware comes-up with a mission-critical license model quickly.

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UCS and VCE vBlock Type 1 Challenge Top VMmark

January 13, 2010

VMmark "Tile" Loads

Last November we reported on the Fujitsu RX300 S5 rack server taking the top VMmark spot for 8-core systems. Yesterday (January 11, 2010) Cisco’s UCS B200-M1 using VMware ESX 4.0 (build 164009) came within 0.5% of the top spot with a score of 25.06@17 tiles. While falling only slightly short of the mark set by the brute force RX300/DX80 combo, the UCS system did so with a very different solution, unsurprisingly similar to the vBlock Type 1 architecture described by Chad Sakacc in his blog post about the VMware, Cisco and EMC alliance.

Given that VMmark is a single node test harness, the difference between rack server and blade server architectures is a non-issue. However, more than just rack vs. blade is going on in this comparison. The Cisco UCS system is being fed by a pair of 10GE converged network adapters – used both for host network access and Fiber Channel bus access – and a monolithic storage array in the guise of a CLARiiON CX4-240 complete with a complement of 20, 73GB STEC SSD’s – just to sweeten the pot.

VMmark Network Configuration for the UCS B200-M1

While it is clear from past VMmark posts that the network speed (beyond 1Gbps) has little to do with the results, it is nice to see the confidence Cisco has in the CNA approach (Cisco UCS M71KR-Q) to go with the “eggs in a basket” solution. Given the storage demands on the CNA, the VMmark result should remove any doubt about the viability (performance) of high-capacity tandems (we’ll leave the physical link security concerns for another day.)

However, where the “rubber meets the road” in this contest is storage I/O and this solution – in our opinion is just plain showing off. With just 41 disks to build from, the CX4-240 has been configured to deliver 37 LUNs – nearly one LUN per unit disk. Before any awards are given out for storage of the year, we need to consider that 36 of those LUNs are RAID0 – yielding a testing platform with no real-world analog (hence “showing off”.)

CLARiiON CX4-240 Storage Build-out for UCS B200-M1 VMmark

Given the ease at which RAID0 can be replaced by RAID1+0, it may be safe to assume that the same results could have been obtained by using 77 disks instead of 41 – at which point the CX4-240 would still be less than half the size of the top VMmark’s 172-disk solution. The reason is clear: SSD’s accelerate I/O loads incredibly well in architectures that support them. If anything, this “runner-up” proves that SSD adoption is on the verge of becoming mainstream.

But what does this test show about UCS? Firstly, it shows that Cisco’s platform can compete with the best solutions out there on CPU and I/O performance (what’s a half a percentage point across 102 virtual machines?) It’s not really a surprise given that the UCS platform was designed to do just that – and within a neatly managed framework. Secondly, it shows that the choice of EMC as a partner was an excellent one. As Martin Glassborow commented on his Storagebod’s Blog, EMC’s involvement in VMware has energized the storage vendor to take bold and innovative steps towards Cloud Computing solutions that it might not have done otherwise (like the RAID0 SSD array). Thirdly and most importantly, it underscores the importance of predictable performance in a virtualization solution. Given the UCS/vBlock approach to systems organization, it can be very difficult not to draw solid parallels between the benchmarks and expectations for net new builds based on the criterion.

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Quick Take: Red Hat and Microsoft Virtual Inter-Op

October 9, 2009

This week Red Hat and Microsoft announced support of certain of their OSes as guests in their respective hypervisor implementations: Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) and Hyper-V, respectively. This comes on the heels of Red Hat’s Enterprise Server 5.4 announcement last month.

KVM is Red Hat’s new hypervisor that leverages the Linux kernel to accelerate support for hardware and capabilities. It was Red Hat and AMD that first demonstrated live migration between AMD and Intel-based hypervisors using KVM late last year – then somewhat of a “Holy Grail” of hypervisor feats. With nearly a year of improvements and integration into their Red Hat Enterprise Server and Fedora “free and open source” offerings, Red Hat is almost ready to strike-out in a commercially viable way.

Microsoft now officially supports the following Red Hat guest operating systems in Hyper-V:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2, 5.3 and 5.4

Red Hat likewise officially supports the following Microsoft quest operating systems in KVM:

Windows Server 2003, 2008 and 2008 R2

The goal of the announcement and associated agreements between Red Hat and Microsoft was to enable a fully supported virtualization infrastructure for enterprises with Red Hat and Microsoft assets. As such, Microsoft and Red Hat are committed to supporting their respective products whether the hypervisor environment is all Red Hat, all Hyper-V or totally heterogeneous – mixing Red Hat KVM and Microsoft Hyper-V as necessary.

“With this announcement, Red Hat and Microsoft are ensuring their customers can resolve any issues related to Microsoft Windows on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating on Microsoft Hyper-V, regardless of whether the problem is related to the operating system or the virtualization implementation.”

Red Hat press release, October 7, 2009

Many in the industry cite Red Hat’s adoption of KVM as a step backwards [from Xen] requiring the re-development of significant amount of support code. However, Red Hat’s use of libvirt as a common management API has allowed the change to happen much more rapidly that critics assumptions had allowed. At Red Hat Summit 2009, key Red Hat officials were keen to point out just how tasty their “dog food” is:

Tim Burke, Red Hat’s vice president of engineering, said that Red Hat already runs much of its own infrastructure, including mail servers and file servers, on KVM, and is working hard to promote KVM with key original equipment manufacturer partners and vendors.

And Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens pointed out in his Summit keynote that with KVM inside the Linux kernel, Red Hat customers will no longer have to choose which applications to virtualize; virtualization will be everywhere and the tools to manage applications will be the same as those used to manage virtualized guests.

Xen vs. KVM, by Pam Derringer, SearchDataCenter.com

For system integrators and virtual infrastructure practices, Red Hat’s play is creating opportunities for differentiation. With a focus on light-weight, high-performance, I/O-driven virtualization applications and no need to support years-old established processes that are dragging on Xen and VMware, KVM stands to leap-frog the competition in the short term.

SOLORI’s Take: This news is good for all Red Hat and Microsoft customers alike. Indeed, it shows that Microsoft realizes that its licenses are being sold into the enterprise whether or not they run on physical hardware. With 20+:1 consolidation ratios now common, that represents a 5:1 license to hardware sale for Microsoft, regardless of the hypervisor. With KVM’s demonstrated CPU agnostic migration capabilities, this opens the door to an even more diverse virtualization infrastructure than ever before.

On the Red Hat side, it demonstrates how rapidly Red Hat has matured its offering following the shift to KVM earlier this year. While KVM is new to Red Hat, it is not new to Linux or aggressive early adopters since being added to the Linux kernel as of 2.6.20 back in September of 2007. With support already in active projects like ConVirt (VM life cycle management), OpenNebula (cloud administration tools), Ganeti, and Enomaly’s Elastic Computing Platform, the game of catch-up for Red Hat and KVM is very likely to be a short one.

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Quick-Take: VMworld 2009 Wrap-Up

September 8, 2009

VMworld 2009 in San Franciso started off with a crash and a fist fight, but ended without further incident. If you’re looking for what happened, it would be hard to beat Duncan Epping’s link-summary of the San Francisco VMworld 2009 at Yellow-Bricks, so we won’t even try. Likewise, Chad Sakacc has some great EMC view point on his Virtualgeek blog, and – fresh from his new book releaseScott Lowe has some great detail about the VMworld keynotes, events and sessions he attended.

There is a great no-spin commentary on VMworld’s “softer underbelly” on Jon William Toigo’s Drunken Data blog – especially the post about Xsigo’s participation in VMworld 2009. Also, Brian Madden has a great wrap-up video of of interviews from the VMworld floor including VMware’s Client Virtualization Platform (CVP) and the software implementation of Teradici’s PC-over-IP.

AMD’s IOMMU was on display using a test mule with two 12-core 6100 processors and a SR5690 chipset. The targets were a FirePro graphics card and a Solarflare 10GE NIC. For IOMMU-based virtualization to have broad appeal, hardware device segmentation must be supported in a manner compatible with vMotion (live migration.) No segmentation was hinted at in AMD’s demo (for FirePro), but the fact that vSphere+IOMMU+Magny-Cours equated to enough stability to be openly demonstrating the technology says a lot about the maturity of AMD’s upcoming chips and chipsets. On the other hand, Solarflare’s demonstration previewed – in 10GE – what could be possible in a future version of IOV for GPU’s:

“The flexible vNIC demonstration will highlight the Solarstorm server adapter’s scalable, virtualized architecture, supporting 100s of virtual machines and 1000s of vNICs. The Solarstorm vNIC architecture provides flexible mapping of vNICs, so that each guest OS can have its own vNIC, as well as traffic management, enabling prioritization and isolation of IP flows between vNICs.”

– Solarflare Press Release

SOLORI’s Take: The controversy surrounding VMware’s “focus” on the VMware “sphere” of products was a non-starter. The name VMworld does not stand for “Virtualization World” – it stands for “VMware World” and denying competitor’s “marketing access” to that venue seems like a reasonable restriction. While it may seem like a strong-arm tactic to some, insisting that vendors/partners are there “for VMworld only” – and hence restricting cross-marketing efforts in and around the venue – makes it more difficult for direct competitors to play the “NASCAR-style marketing” (as Toigo calls it) game.

VMworld is a showcase for technologies driving the virtualization eco-system as seen from VMware’s perspective. While there are a growing number of competitors for virtualization mind-share, VMware’s pace and vision – to date – has been driven by careful observation of use-case more so than innovation for innovation’s sake. It is this attention to business need that has made VMware successful and what defines VMworld’s focus – and it is in that light that VMworld 2009 looks like a great success.