Archive for the ‘New Products’ Category

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Quick-Take: NexentaStor 4.0.1GA

April 14, 2014

Our open storage partner, Nexenta Systems Inc., hit a milestone this month by releasing NexentaStor 4.0.1 for general availability. This release is significant mainly because it is the first commercial release of NexentaStor based on the Open Source Illumos kernel and not Oracle’s OpenSolaris (now closed source). With this move, NexentaStor’s adhering to the company’s  promise of “open source technology” that enables hardware independence and targeted flexibility.

Some highlights in 4.0.1:

  • Faster Install times
  • Better HA Cluster failover times and “easier” cluster manageability
  • Support for large memory host configurations – up to 512GB of DRAM per head/controller
  • Improved handling of intermittently faulty devices (disks with irregular I/O responses under load)
  • New (read: “not backward compatible”) Auto-Sync replication (user configurable zfs+ssh still available for backward compatibility) with support for replication of HA to/from non-HA clusters
    • Includes LZ4 compression (fast) option
    • Better Control of “Force Flags” from NMV
    • Better Control of Buffering and Connections
  • L2ARC Compression now supported
    • Potentially doubles the effective coverage of L2ARC (for compressible data sets)
    • Supports LZ4 compression (fast)
    • Automatically applied if dataset is likewise compressed
  • Server Message Block v2.1 support for Windows (some caveats for IDMAP users)
  • iSCSI support for Microsoft Server 2012 Cluster and Cluster Shared Volume (CSV)
  • Guided storage pool configuration wizards – Performance, Balanced and Capacity modes
  • Enhanced Support Data and Log Gathering
  • High Availability Cluster plug-in (RSF-1) binaries are now part of the installation image
  • VMware: Much better VMXNET3 support
    • no more log spew
    • MTU settings work from NMV
  • VMware: Install to PVSCSI (boot disk) from ISO no longer requires tricks
  • Upgrade from 3.x is currently “disruptive” – promised “non-disruptive” in next maintenance update
  • Improved DTrace capabilities from NMC shell for
    • COMSTAR/iSCSI/FC
    • general IO
  • Snappier, more stable NMV/GUI
    • Service port changes from 2000 to 8457
    • Multi-NMS default
    • Fast refresh for ZFS containers
    • RSF-1 defaults in “Server” settings
    • Improved iSCSI

See Nexenta’s 4.0.1 Release Notes for additional changes and details.

Note, the 18TB Community Edition EULA is still hampered by the “non-commercial” language, restricting it’s use to home, education and academic (ie. training, testing, lab, etc.) targets. However, the “total amount of Storage Space” license for Community is a deviation from the Enterprise licensing (typical “raw” storage entitlement)

2.2 If You have acquired a Community Edition license, the total amount of Storage Space is limited as specified on the Site and is subject to change without notice. The Community Edition may ONLY be used for educational, academic and other non-commercial purposes expressly excluding any commercial usage. The Trial Edition licenses may ONLY be used for the sole purposes of evaluating the suitability of the Product for licensing of the Enterprise Edition for a fee. If You have obtained the Product under discounted educational pricing, You are only permitted to use the Product for educational and academic purposes only and such license expressly excludes any commercial purposes.

– NexentaStor EULA, Version 4.0; Last updated: March 18, 2014

For those who operate under the Community license, this means your total physical storage is UNLIMITED, provided your space “IN USE” falls short of 18TB (18,432 GB) at all times. Where this is important is in constructing useful arrays with “currently available” disks (SATA, SAS, etc.) Let’s say you needed 16TB of AVAILABLE space using “modern” 3TB disks. The fact that your spinning disks are individually larger than 600GB indicates that array rebuild times might run afoul of failure PRIOR to the completion of the rebuild (encountering data loss) and mirror or raidz2/raidz3 would be your best bet for array configuration.

SOLORI Note: Richard Elling made this concept exceedingly clear back in 2010, and his “ZFS data protection comparison” of 2, 3 and 4-way mirrors to raidz, raidz2 and raidz3 is still a great reference on the topic.

Elling’s MTTDL Comparison by RAID Type

 

Given 16TB in 3-way mirror or raidz2 (roughly equivalent MTTDL predictors), your 3TiB disk count would follow as:

3-way Mirror Disks := RoundUp( 16 * (1024 / 1000)^3 / 70% / ( 3 * (1000 / 1024)^3 )  ) * 3 = 27 disks, or

6-disk Raidz2 Disks := RoundUp( 16 * (1024 / 1000)^3 / 70% / ( 4 * 3 * (1000 / 1024)^3 )  ) * 6 = 18 disks

By “raw” licensing standards, the 3-way mirror would require a 76TB license while the raidz2 volume would require a 51TB license – a difference of 25TB in licensing (around $5,300 retail). However, under the Community License, the “cost” is exactly the same, allowing for a considerable amount of flexibility in array loadout and configuration.

Why do I need 54TiB in disk to make 16TB of “AVAILABLE” storage in Raidz2?

The RAID grouping we’ve chosen is 6-disk raidz2 – that’s akin to 4 data and 2 parity disks in RAID6 (without the fixed stripe requirement or the “write hole penalty.”) This means, on average, one third of the space consumed on-disk will be in the form of parity information. Therefore, right of the top, we’re losing 33% of the disk capacity. Likewise, disk manufacturers make TiB not TB disks, so we lose 7% of “capacity” in the conversion from TiB to TB. Additionally, we like to have a healthy amount of space reserved for new block allocation and recommend 30% unused space as a target. All combined, a 6-disk raidz array is, at best, 43% efficient in terms of capacity (by contrast, 3-way mirror is only 22% space efficient). For an array based on 3TiB disks, we therefore get only 1.3TB of usable storage – per disk – with 6-disk raidz (by contrast, 10-disk raidz nets only 160GB additional “usable” space per disk.)

 SOLORI’s Take: If you’re running 3.x in production, 4.0.1 is not suitable for in-place upgrades (yet) so testing and waiting for the “non-disruptive” maintenance release is your best option. For new installations – especially inside a VM or hypervisor environment as a Virtual Storage Appliance (VSA) – version 4.0.1 presents a better option over it’s 3.x siblings. If you’re familiar with 3.x, there’s not much new on the NMV side outside better tunables and snappier response.

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Short-Take: vSphere vCloud Suite – Cheat Sheet

August 27, 2012

VMworld 2012 Announcements

VMware announces a new product package based on vCloud Director and vSphere Enterprise Plus called vCloud Suite. Existing users of vSphere Enterprise Plus (with valid SnS as of 8/27/2012) – including Academic and Federal users – may qualify for a “free” upgrade (actually $1/CPU) to “Standard” edition of vCloud Suite. Likewise, users with valid SnS and vSphere Enterprise (not Plus) qualify for a reduced cost upgrade to vCloud Suite Standard at $682/CPU.

Qualifying users have until December 15, 2012 to complete the transaction. Upgrades to other editions of vCloud Suite from Enterprise and Enterprise Plus are available as well – at additional cost per CPU.

vCloud Suite Cheat Sheet

Summary of new vCloud Suite offering and tiers (including links):

vCloud Suite
Standard Advanced Enterprise
Virtualization VMware vSphere Enterprise Plus Edition * * *
Cloud Infrastructure vCloud Director and vCloud Connector * * *
Standard vCloud Networking and Security * * *
Advanced vCloud Networking and Security * *
vCenter Site Recovery Manager Enterprise *
Operations Management vCenter Operations Management Suite vCOps Advanced vCOps Enterprise
VMware vCenter Chargeback Manager™ *
VMware vCenter Configuration Manager™ *
VMware vCenter Infrastructure Navigator™ *
vFabric Application Director *
Licensing Per CPU, Enterprise Plus basis $4,995.00 $7,495.00 $11,495.00
Support Basic: Per CPU, Per Year $1,049.00 $1,574.00 $2,414.00
Production: Per CPU, Per Year $1,249.00 $1,874.00 $2,874.00

Per-VM Pricing All But Gone

The introduction of vCloud Suite side-steps the vCloud Director per-VM licensing model and allows private cloud to scale based on the more predictable per-CPU infrastructure metric. Public cloud service providers will still be interested in per-VM foot prints and billing structures, but at least private cloud can be unshackled from the confines of per-VM vCD and vRAM issues; which segways nicely into the next tidbit…

In Other News…

VMware effectively kills vRAM by including “unlimited” vRAM entitlements in all editions of vSphere.

SMB’s may be pleased to note that VMware also now includes the vSphere Storate Appliance with all acceleration kits except vSphere Essentials at no additional cost (versus vSphere 5.0 kits). This is especially good for ROBO operations using Essentials Plus. The standalone cost for vSphere Storage Appliance is now $3,495.

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Short Take: VMware View Client for Android, ICS Update

May 17, 2012

An updated VMware View Client for Android devices hit a the street today sporting a couple of enhancements for Google’s Android OS running the relatively new Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) version; other improvements are for View 5.1 deployments only.

Here’s a list of the new features in the update available now on Google Play:

– Support for ICS
– Mouse support with hover, right click and scroll wheel (ICS)
– Updated look and feel and improvements for smaller screens
– New Settings dialog includes security mode settings
– Up to 2x better video playback performance
– Optimized for View 5.1
– RADIUS two factor authentication with View 5.1
– Save password option (administrator approval required) with View 5.1
– French, German, Spanish keyboard support with View 5.1

The update is a 5.32MB download, and is available free of charge.

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In-the-Lab: NexentaStor and VMware Tools, You Need to Tweak It…

February 24, 2012

While working on an article on complex VSA’s (i.e. a virtual storage appliance with PCIe pass-through SAS controllers) an old issue came back up again: NexentaStor virtual machines still have a problem installing VMware Tools since it branched from Open Solaris and began using Illumos. While this isn’t totally Nexenta’s fault – there is no “Nexenta” OS type in VMware to choose from – it would be nice if a dummy package was present to allow a smooth installation of VMware Tools; this is even the case with the latest NexentaStor release: 3.1.2.

I could not find where I had documented the fix in SOLORI’s blog, so here it is… Note, the NexentaStor VM is configured as an Oracle Solaris 11 (64-bit) virtual machine for the purpose of vCenter/ESXi. This establishes the VM’s relationship to a specific VMware Tools load. Installation of VMware Tools in NexentaStor is covered in detail in an earlier blog entry.

VMware Tools bombs-out at SUNWuiu8 package failure. Illumos-based NexentaStor has no such package.

Instead, we need to modify the vmware-config-tools.pl script directly to compensate for the loss of the SUNWuiu8 package that is explicitly required in the installation script.

Commenting out the SUNWuiu8 related section allows the tools to install with no harm to the system or functionality.

Note the full “if” stanza for where the VMware Tools installer checks for ‘tools-for-solaris’ must be commented out. Since the SUNWuiu8 package does not exist – and more importantly is not needed for Illumos/Nexenta – removing a reference to it is a good thing. Now the installation can proceed as normal.

After the changes, installation completes as normal.

That’s all there is to getting the “Oracle Solaris” version of VMware Tools to work in newer NexentaStor virtual machines – now back to really fast VSA’s with JBOD-attached storage…

SOLORI’s Note: There is currently a long-standing bug that affects NexentaStor 3.1.x running as a virtual machine. Currently there is no known workaround to keep NexentaStor from running up a 50% cpu utilization from ESXi’s perspective. Inside the NexentaStor VM we see very little CPU utilization, but from the performance tab, we see 50% utilization on every configured vCPU allocated to the VM. Nexenta is reportedly looking into the cause of the problem.

I looked through this and there is nothing that stands out other that a huge number of interrupts while idle. I am not sure where those interrupts are coming from. I see something occasionally called volume-check and nmdtrace which could be causing the interrupts.

Nexenta Support

A bug report was reportedly filed a couple of days ago to investigate the issue further.

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Quick-Take: VMworld 2011, Thoughts on the Airplane

August 28, 2011

On the way to VMworld this morning this morning I started-out by listening to @Scott_lowe, @mike_laverick and @duncanyp about stretched clusters and some esoteric storage considerations. Then i was off reading @sakacc blogging about his take on stretch clusters and the black hole of node failure when I stumbled on a retweet @bgracely via @andreliebovici about the spectre of change in our industry. Suddenly these things seemed very well related within the context of my destination: VMworld 2011.

Back about a month ago when vSphere 5 was announced the buzz about the “upgrade” was consumed by discussions about licensing and vRAM. Naturally, this was not the focus VMware was hoping for, especially considering how much of a step forward vSphere 5 is over VS4. Rather, VMware – by all deserved rights – wanted to hear “excited” conversations about how VS5 was closing the gap on vCloud architecture problems and pain-points.

Personally, I managed to keep the vRAM licensing issue out of SOLORI’s blog for two reasons: 1) the initial vRAM targets were so off that VMware had to make a change, and 2) significant avenues for the discussion were available elsewhere. That does not mean I wasn’t outspoken about my thoughts on vRAM – made obvious by contributions to some community discussions on the topic – or VMware’s reasoning for moving to vRAM. Suffice to say VMware did “the right thing” – as I had confidence they would – and the current vRAM targets capture 100% of my clients without additional licenses.

I hinted that VS5 answers a lot of the hanging questions from VS4 in terms of facilitating how cloud confederations are architected, but the question is: in the distraction, did VS5’s “goodness” get lost in the scuffle? If so, can they get back the mind share they may have lost to Chicken Little reactionaries?

First, if VMware’s lost ground to anyone, it’s VMware. The vast majority of cool-headed admins I talked to were either not affected by vRAM or were willing to take a wait-and-see outlook on vSphere 5 with continued use of vSphere 4.1. Some did evaluate Hyper-V’s “readiness” but most didn’t blink. By comparison, vSphere 4.1 still had more to offer private cloud than anything else.

Secondly, vSphere 5 “goodness” did get lost in the scuffle, and that’s okay! It may be somewhat counter intuitive but I believe VMware will actually come out well ahead of their “would be” position in the market, and it is precisely because of these things, not just in spite of them. Here’s my reasoning:

1) In the way the vSphere 5 launch announcement and vRAM licensing debacle unfolded, lot of the “hot air” about vRAM was vented along the way. Subsequently, VMware gained some service cred by actually listening to their client base and making a significant change to their platform pricing model. VMware got more bang-for-their-buck out of that move as the effect on stock price may never be known here, given the timing of the S&P ratings splash, but I would have expected to see a slight hit. Fortunately, 20-30% sector slides trump vRAM, and only Microsoft is talking about vRAM now (that is until they adopt something similar.)

On that topic, anytime you can get your competitor talking about your product instead of theirs, it usually turns out to be a good thing. Even in this case, where the topic has nothing to do with the needs of most businesses, negative marketing against vRAM will ultimately do more to establish VMware as an innovator than an “already too expensive alternative to XYZ.”

2) SOLORI’s law of conservation of marketing momentum: goodness preserved, not destroyed. VMworld 2011 turns out to be perfectly timed to generate excitement in all of the “goodness” that vSphere 5 has to offer. More importantly, it can now do so with increased vigor and without a lot of energy siphoned-off discussing vRAM, utilization models and what have you: been there done that, on to the meat and away with the garnish.

3) Again it’s odd timing, but the market slide has more folks looking at cloud than ever before. Confidence in cloud offerings has been a deterrent for private cloud users, partly because of the “no clear choices” scenario and partly because concerns about data migration in and around the public cloud. Instability and weak growth in the world economy have people reevaluating CAPEX-heavy initiatives as well as priorities. The bar for cloud offerings has never been lower.

In vSphere 5, VMware hints at the ability for more cloud providers to be transparent to the subscriber: if they adopt vSphere. Ultimately, this will facilitate vendor agnosticism much like the early days of the Internet. Back then, operators discovered that common protocols allowed for dial-up vendors to share resources in a reciprocal and transparent manner. This allowed the resources of provider A to be utilized by a subscriber of provider B: the end user was completely unaware of the difference. For those that don’t have strict requirements on where their data “lives” and/or are more interested in adherence to availability and SLA requirements, this can actually induce a broader market instead of a narrower one.

If you’ve looked past vRAM, you may have noticed for yourself that vSphere has more to deliver cloud offerings than ever before. VMware will try to convince you that whether cloud bursting, migrating to cloud or expanding hybrid cloud options, having a common underlying architecture promotes better flexibility and reduces overall cost and complexity. They want you to conclude that vSphere 5 is the basis for that architecture. Many will come away from Las Vegas – having seen it – believing it too.

So, as I – and an estimated 20K+ other virtualization junkies – head off to Las Vegas for a week of geek overload, parties and social networking, my thoughts turn to @duncanyp‘s 140+ improvements, enhancements and advances waiting back home in my vSphere 5 lab. Last week he challenged his “followers” to be the first to post examples of all of them; with the myriad of hands-on labs and expert sessions just over the horizon, I hope to do it one better and actually experience them first hand.

These things all add up to a win-win for VMware and a strong showing for VMworld. It’s going to be an exciting and – tip of the hat to @bgracely – industry changing week! Now off to the fray…

References:

See Mike Laverick’s chinwag podcasts

See Chad’s Sakacc’s VirtualGeek blog on stretched cluster issues to overcome

(excuse typos today, wordpress iPad…)

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Short-Take: Nexenta 3.1 Adds VAAI Support, Auto-Sync Resume

August 3, 2011

Nexneta Systems Inc released version 3.1 of its open storage software yesterday with a couple of VMware vSphere-specific feature enhancements. These enhancements are specifically targets at VMware’s vStorage API for Array Integration (VAAI) which promises to accelerate certain “costly” storage operations by pushing their implementation to the storage array instead of the ESX host.

From NexentaStor 3.1 Release Notes, the primitives implemented in 3.1 that contribute to VAAI support include:

  • SCSI Write Same: Supported in vSphere 4.1 and later
    Example. Accelerates zero block writes when creating new virtual disks.
  • SCSI ATS (Atomic Test & Set): Supported in vSphere 4.1 and later.
    Example. Enables specific LUN “region” to be locked instead of entire LUN when cloning a VM.
  • SCSI Block Copy: Supported in vSphere 4.1 and later.
    Example. Avoids reading and writing of block data “through” the ESX host during a block copy operation by allowing VMware to instruct the SAN to do so.
  • SCSI Unmap: Supported in vSphere 5 and later. Enables freed blocks to be returned to the zpool for new allocation when no longer used for VM storage.

Additional “optimizations” and improvements from Nexenta in 3.1 include:

  • In-flight deduplication
  • ARC performance enhancements
  • multiple connections per session for iSCSI
  • DMU fast path for iSCSI (i.e. no extra copy)
  • Auto-sync “resume” with progress bar in GUI/NMV and ability to change source/destination paths OTF
  • Parallel tasks in NMV (i.e. no more busy process “hangs”)
  • Improved CIFS performance
  • Support for multiple DC/DC fail-over for CIFS
  • Better cross-forrest trusts with CIFS
  • Configuration monitoring/reporting via “ConfGuard” plug-in
  • Multiple VIP per service for HA Cluster, fail-over of local users and elimination of separate heartbeat device
  • JBOD management for select devices from within the NMV

Given the addition of VAAI features, the upgrade offers some compelling reasons to make the move to NexentaStor 3.1 and at the same time removes obstacles from choosing NexentaStor as a VMware iSCSI platform for SMB/SME (versus low-end EMC VNXE, which at last look was still waiting on VAAI support.) However, for existing vSphere 4.1+ environments, a word of caution: you will want to “test, test, test” before upgrading to (or enabling) VAAI (fortunately, there’s a NexentaStor VSA available).

Auto-Sync Resume

In the past, NexentaStor’s auto-sync plug-in has been the only integrated means of block replication from one storage pool (or array) to another. In the past, the plug-in allowed for periodic replication events to be scheduled which drew from a marker snapshot until the replication was complete. Upon extended error (where the replication fails), the failure of the replication causes a roll-back to the marker point, eliminating any data that has transferred between the pools. For WAN replication, this can be costly as no check-points are created along the way.

More problematically, there has been no way to recreate a replication service in the event it has been either deleted or missing (i.e. zpool moved to a new host.) This creates a requirement for the replication to start over from scratch – a problem for very large datasets. With Auto-Sync 3.1, later problem is resolved, and provided NexentaStor can find at least one pair of identical snapshots for the file system.

Where I find this new “feature” particularly helpful is in seed replications to external storage devices (i.e. USB2.0 arrays, JBODs, etc.). This allows for a replication to external, removable storage to (1) be completed locally, (2) shipped to a central repository, and (3) a remote replication service created to continue the replication updates over the WAN.

Additionally, consider the case where the above local-to-WAN replication seeding takes place over the course of several months and the hardware at the central repository fails, requiring the replication pool to be moved to another NexentaStor instance. In the past, the limitation on auto-sync would have required a brand new replication set, regardless of the consistency of the replicated data on the relocated pool. Now, a new (replacement) service can be created pointing to the new destination, and auto-sync promises to find the data – intact – and resume the replication updates starting with the last identical marker snapshot.

NexentaStor Native Transport

The default transport for replication in NexentaStor 3.1 is now NexentaStor’s TCP-based Remote Replication protocol (RR). While SSH is still an option for non-NexentaStor destinations, netcat is no longer supported for auto-sync replications. While no indication of performance benefits are available, two tunable parameters are available for RR auto-sync services (per service): TCP connection count (-n) and TCP package size (-P). Defaults for each of these are 4 and 1024, respectively, meaning 4 connections and 1024KB PDU size for the replication session.

Conclusions

For VMware vSphere deployments in SMB, SME and ROBO environments, NexentaStor 3.1 looks to be a good fit, offering high-performance CIFS, NFS, iSCSI and Fiber Channel options in a unified storage environment complete with VAAI support to accelerate vStorage applications. For VMware View installations using NexentaStor, the VAAI/ATS feature should resolve some iSCSI locking behavior issues that have made NFS more attractive but remove SCSI-based VAAI features. That said, with the storage provisioning changes in View 4.5 and upcoming View 5, the ability to pick from FC, iSCSI or NFS (especially at 10G) from within the same storage platform has definite advantages (if not complexity implications.) Suffice to say, NexentaStor’s update is adding more open storage tools to the VMware virtualization architect’s bag of tricks.

NexentaStor 3.1 is available for download now.

Update, 8/12/2011:

Nexenta has found some problems with 3.1 post Q/A. They’ve released this statement on the matter:

Nexenta places the highest importance on maintaining access to and integrity of customer data. The purpose of this Technical Bulletin is to make you aware of an issue with the process of upgrading to 3.1. Nexenta has discovered an issue with the software delivery mechanism we use. This issue can result in errors during the upgrade process and some functionality not being installed properly. Please postpone upgrading to v3.1 until our next Technical Bulletin update. We are actively working to get this corrected and get it back to 100 % service as fast as possible. Until the issue is resolved we have removed 3.1 from the website and suspended upgrades. Thanks for your patience.

Nexenta Support, Aug. 6, 2011

According to sources from within Nexenta, the problems appear to be more related to APT repository/distribution issues “rather than the 3.1 codebase.” All ISO and repository distribution for 3.1 has been pulled until further notice and links to information about 3.1 on the corporate Nexenta site are no longer working…

Update, 8/17/2011:

Today, while working on a follow-up post, the lab systems (virtual storage appliances) were updated to NexentaStor 3.1.1 (both Enterprise and Community editions). Since a question was raised about the applicability of the VAAI enhancements to Community Edition (NexentaStor CE), I’ve got a teaser for you: see the following image of two identical LUNs mounted to an ESXi host from NexentaStor Enterprise Edition (NSEE) and NexentaStor Community Edition (NSCE). If you look closely, you’ll notice they BOTH show “supported” status.

vSphere VMFS5 Datastores provided by NexentaStor Community (VSA04) and Enterprise (VSA03) editions.

Update, 8/19/2011:

Nexenta officially re-released NexentaStor 3.1 today in the form of version 3.1.1 – it is available for download now.

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Short-Take: VMware View PCoIP Client for Android

July 15, 2011

Today VMware released a “Tech Preview” version of VMware’s View Client for Android: a PCoIP-only client suitable for LAN and WAN (via PCoIP Secure Gateway). We’ve had a quick first look this evening when the application appeared on Android Market – a free download – and it looks great. On my NotionInk Adam tablet (NVidia 1GHz dual-core) running Honeycomb 3.0.1 the display updates where just as snappy as my iPad2 running View Client for iPad. The only problem I experienced in the hour or so of working with the client is the lack of three-finger support in the Adam/Honeycomb port to spawn the pop-up keyboard.

The View PCoIP Client for Android supports the same saved desktop icon paradigm as it's iPad predecessor for quick access.

The View PCoIP Client for Android allows for desktop connections to stay active even when the app is not in the foreground - a one-up on the iPad predecessor.

Android View PCoIP Client - Task switching to other Android application

Task switching in View PCoIP Client for Android works just like any other Android application.

Android View PCoIP Client - Retrieving a View desktop from background

View PCoIP Client for Android is easily restored from the background without reconnection delays.

And yes, that last screen shot shows 1-bar on AT&T’s 3G network and it’s totally useable just like on the iPad. If you’re waiting for a rocking View client before plunking down money on that 10.1″ ASUS EEpad Transformer (now with Honeycomb 3.1) and it’s keyboard/mousepad “docking” station (complete with additional run-time doubling battery) then wait no more: Android has arrived. Remember though, this is just a “Tech Preview” and the apple needs a bit more polishing before you go running to your CIO…

SOLORI’s Note: Although the View Client for Android was “optimized” for 1280×800 format, it still had no problem with the more limited 1024×600 Pixel Qi display on my NotionInk Adam. In fact, changes in rotation on the Android seemed faster than on iPad2 and multitasking on the Honeycomb system did no seemed to be affected to a backgrounded desktop.

As another test to compatibility, I tested small-screen PCoIP goodness on my Samsung Fascinate and it rocks! Beware, there is just enough display to be useful with the pop-up keyboard on-screen, however and the scroll-back on the screen with keyboard in foreground made for interesting URL entry while trying to get to Hulu, but audio was clear and frame rates at about 3-5 fps (visual est.) but very clear. Task switching on the single-core Android Froyo device worked flawlessly too.

How did Hulu fare on Honeycomb? Unfortunately it was not up to scratch in full screen, but I found it passable in the embedded mode (Mozilla 3.6). This kind of performance issue will likely be very platform dependent on Android version, CPU, display and vendor tweaks to the Google Android kernel – especially hacked kernels like the NI Adam (tested). Unlike the Apple-controlled IOS, Android leaves a lot of performance enhancements to platform providers and most just pass-on the reference kernel without significant improvement in performance. For a “preview” release, Team Fox at VMware has delivered the goods.

VMware’s official blog post has a quick walk-through video. A User Guide and Release Notes are also available from VMware.