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Quick-Take: VMworld 2009 Wrap-Up

September 8, 2009

VMworld 2009 in San Franciso started off with a crash and a fist fight, but ended without further incident. If you’re looking for what happened, it would be hard to beat Duncan Epping’s link-summary of the San Francisco VMworld 2009 at Yellow-Bricks, so we won’t even try. Likewise, Chad Sakacc has some great EMC view point on his Virtualgeek blog, and – fresh from his new book releaseScott Lowe has some great detail about the VMworld keynotes, events and sessions he attended.

There is a great no-spin commentary on VMworld’s “softer underbelly” on Jon William Toigo’s Drunken Data blog – especially the post about Xsigo’s participation in VMworld 2009. Also, Brian Madden has a great wrap-up video of of interviews from the VMworld floor including VMware’s Client Virtualization Platform (CVP) and the software implementation of Teradici’s PC-over-IP.

AMD’s IOMMU was on display using a test mule with two 12-core 6100 processors and a SR5690 chipset. The targets were a FirePro graphics card and a Solarflare 10GE NIC. For IOMMU-based virtualization to have broad appeal, hardware device segmentation must be supported in a manner compatible with vMotion (live migration.) No segmentation was hinted at in AMD’s demo (for FirePro), but the fact that vSphere+IOMMU+Magny-Cours equated to enough stability to be openly demonstrating the technology says a lot about the maturity of AMD’s upcoming chips and chipsets. On the other hand, Solarflare’s demonstration previewed – in 10GE – what could be possible in a future version of IOV for GPU’s:

“The flexible vNIC demonstration will highlight the Solarstorm server adapter’s scalable, virtualized architecture, supporting 100s of virtual machines and 1000s of vNICs. The Solarstorm vNIC architecture provides flexible mapping of vNICs, so that each guest OS can have its own vNIC, as well as traffic management, enabling prioritization and isolation of IP flows between vNICs.”

– Solarflare Press Release

SOLORI’s Take: The controversy surrounding VMware’s “focus” on the VMware “sphere” of products was a non-starter. The name VMworld does not stand for “Virtualization World” – it stands for “VMware World” and denying competitor’s “marketing access” to that venue seems like a reasonable restriction. While it may seem like a strong-arm tactic to some, insisting that vendors/partners are there “for VMworld only” – and hence restricting cross-marketing efforts in and around the venue – makes it more difficult for direct competitors to play the “NASCAR-style marketing” (as Toigo calls it) game.

VMworld is a showcase for technologies driving the virtualization eco-system as seen from VMware’s perspective. While there are a growing number of competitors for virtualization mind-share, VMware’s pace and vision – to date – has been driven by careful observation of use-case more so than innovation for innovation’s sake. It is this attention to business need that has made VMware successful and what defines VMworld’s focus – and it is in that light that VMworld 2009 looks like a great success.

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