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Quick-Take: vCenter Server 5.0 Update 1b, Appliance Replaced DB2 with Postgres

August 17, 2012

VMware announced the availability of vCenter Server 5.0 Update 1b today along with some really good news for the fans of openness:

vCenter Server Appliance Database Support: The DB2 express embedded database provided with the vCenter Server Appliance has been replaced with VMware vPostgres database. This decreases the appliance footprint and reduces the time to deploy vCenter Server further.

- vCenter 5.0U1b Release Notes

Ironically and despite its reference in the release notes, the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix has yet to be updated to include 5.0U1b for reference, so  the official impact of an upgrade is as-yet unknown.

VMware Product Interoperability Matrix not updated at time of vCenter 5U1b release.

Also, couple of new test questions are going to be tricky moving forward as the support for Oracle has been expanded:

  • vCenter Server 5.0 Update 1b introduces support for the following vCenter Databases
    • Oracle 11g Enterprise Edition, Standard Edition, Standard ONE Edition Release 2 [11.2.0.3] – 64 bit
    • Oracle 11g Enterprise Edition, Standard Edition, Standard ONE Edition Release 2 [11.2.0.3] – 32 bit

Besides still not supporting IPv6 and continuing the limitation of 5 hosts and 50 VMs, there is some additional leg work needed to upgrade the vCenter Server Appliance 5.0U1a to U1b as specified in KB2017801:

  1. Create a new virtual disk with size 20GB and attach it to the vCenter Server Appliance.
  2. Log in to the vCenter Server Appliance’s console and format the new disk as follows:
    1. At the command line, type, “echo “- – -” > /sys/class/scsi_host/host0/scan”.
    2. Type, “parted -s /dev/sdc mklabel msdos”.
    3. Type, “parted -s /dev/sdc mkpartfs primary ext2 0 22G”.
  3. Mount the new partition under /storage/db/export:
    1. Type, “mkdir -p /storage/db/export”.
    2. Type, “mount /dev/sdc1 /storage/db/export”.
  4. Repeat the update process.
  5. You can remove the new disk after the update process finishes successfully and the vCenter Server Appliance is shut down.

SOLORI’s Take: Until the interop matrix is updated, it’s hard to know what you’re getting into with the update (Update: as you can see from Joshua Andrews’ post on SOS tech), but the inclusion of vPostgres – VMware’s vFabric deployment of PostgreSQL 9.1.x – makes taking a look at the “crippled” appliance version a bit more tantalizing.  Hopefully, the next release will “unshackle” the vCenter Appliance beyond the 5/50 limitations – certainly vPostgres is up to the task of managing many, many more hosts and VMs (vCD anyone?) Cheers, VMware!

One comment

  1. Very good read. I’m working on re-architecting our storage environment here as I upgrade to ESXi 5.1 and mature our environment. I’m gathering the pros and cons of running either VMFS5 via FC LUNs or NFS. We are running NetApp DATA OnTap 8.1 for storage. We have 10Gbe FC in place so it makes sense to take advantage of the associated speed as there is no cost involved as we already own it. There are also benefits to running NFS with the native access to WAFL in NetApp and the thin provisioning from the storage side. A lot of the drawbacks to VMFS were eliminated with VAAI and the other features prevalent in version 5. I’m now looking into creating a mixed environment of VMFS5 and NFS. Either way it’s pretty daunting making sure I plan ahead correctly based on our storage needs as well as virtualization needs.



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